Early English Drama

Edited by Pamela M. King, Sue Niebrzydowski and Diana Wyatt

Yearbook of English Studies 43

Modern Humanities Research Association

1 January 2013  •  392pp

ISBN: 978-1-781880-80-7 (paperback)

Access online: At JSTOR

EnglishDrama


The Yearbook of English Studies 2013 is devoted to early English drama, ranging from what is generally understood as ‘medieval’ to plays of the early Tudor period, while also including chapters on modern theatrical responses to the surviving corpus of texts. The volume is edited by Pamela King (Professor of English at the University of Glasgow), Sue Niebrzydowski (Senior Lecturer in Medieval English Literature at Bangor University, Wales) and Diana Wyatt (Research Associate at the University of Durham). This rich and varied collection is deliberately loosely ordered in order to encourage the reader to think again about the old canonical categories, particularly ‘mysteries’ and ‘moralities’. The authors lead the reader to engage with recent scholarship in the field which has, for example, drawn on archival research into lost plays to question old certainties about genre, about chronology, and about evolution, and which has taken another look at surviving texts in ways that resist categorization, and found them to be more problematic than hitherto assumed.

This volume does not aim to offer coverage of new work in a known field, so there is, for example, no essay dedicated to the York Cycle, although references to it are shot through the whole. Rather, individual chapters reflect not only their authors’ specialist sub-fields but also a variety of approaches, from the study of sources and the materiality of surviving witnesses to the texts, to various critical readings and approaches, to studies in the history of staging. In addition, essays on modern productions stake the claim for a new and distinct area in the study of medievalism, as modern authors and producers draw inspiration from the original early scripts. The reader will encounter old favourites in this volume — the Towneley Plays, the Chester Cycle, The Castle of Perseverance, Ane Satyre of the Thrie Estaitis, to name a few — as well as Bewnans Ke, the Cornish saint’s play discovered only in 1999, and an intriguing mixture of hagiography and Arthuriana. Equally, the reader will be led to reconsider some lesser-read texts and to encounter traces of wonderful plays which have been lost forever. Overall, the volume seeks to engage with a dramatic tradition which was at once richer and more varied than has been conventionally imagined.

Contents:

1-3
Preface
David Mills
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4-11
Introduction: ‘Hither we are sent a Message for to say’
Pamela M. King, Sue Niebrzydowski, Diana Wyatt
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12-30
On Lawrence of Durham's Peregrini
John McKinnell
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31-47
‘Olde playes or maskes but Imperfect & little worthe’
Alexandra F. Johnston
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48-68
Arks, Crafts and Authorities: Textual and Contextual Evidence for North-Eastern English Noah Plays
Diana Wyatt
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69-86
The Early English Passion Play
Pamela M. King
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87-104
Re-editing Towneley
Garrett P. J. Epp
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105-120
‘Faming of the Shrews’: Medieval Drama and Feminist Approaches
Katie Normington
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121-139
Secular Women and Late-Medieval Marian Drama
Sue Niebrzydowski
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140-155
Speculum Urbis: The Chester Cycle as a Tool of Social Cohesion and Transformation
Sheila Christie
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156-173
The Staging of the Middle Cornish Play Bewnans Ke (‘The Life of St Kea’)
Alan J. Fletcher
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174-202
Directing Mankind in the Twenty-First Century
Philip Crispin
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203-222
Towards a Reformed Theatre: David Lyndsay and Ane Satyre of the Thrie Estaitis
Sarah Carpenter
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223-242
Conscience and Satire in John Heywood's Play of Love
Greg Walker
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243-261
Playing with Books in John Bale's Three Laws
Tamara Atkin
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262-280
The Widow and Nemesis: Costuming Two Allegorical Figures in a Play for Queen Mary Tudor
Meg Twycross
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281-298
‘Obedience is good, but …’: Christopher Goodman, the Chester Plays, and the Problem of Authority
Elizabeth Baldwin
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299-317
Tryfyls, Toys, Mokkes, Fables, and Nyfyls: The Government of Fools and Fabliaux in Johan Johan (1533)
Andrew Hiscock
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318-342
Late Medieval Performing Dragons
Philip Butterworth
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343-366
Medieval Mystery Plays in the Modern World: A Question of Relevance?
Margaret Rogerson
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367-373
The Fortune of Wheels: Pageant Staging Rediscovered
Jane Oakshott, Mbe
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Bibliography entry:

King, Pamela M., Sue Niebrzydowski, and Diana Wyatt (eds), Early English Drama (= Yearbook of English Studies, 43.1 (2013))

First footnote reference: 35 Early English Drama, ed. by Pamela M. King, Sue Niebrzydowski and Diana Wyatt (= Yearbook of English Studies, 43.1 (2013)), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 King, Niebrzydowski, and Wyatt, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

King, Pamela M., Sue Niebrzydowski, and Diana Wyatt (eds). 2013. Early English Drama (= Yearbook of English Studies, 43.1)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (King, Niebrzydowski, and Wyatt 2013: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 King, Niebrzydowski, and Wyatt 2013: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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