Recent Reviews of MHRA Books

MHRA books are regularly reviewed in scholarly journals across the world, and sometimes also in literary papers such as the Times Literary Supplement. From time to time, our books also appear in Europe’s newspapers, from The Independent and the Daily Telegraph to El Imparcial and Gazeta Shqiptare. The following excerpts are from the 20 most recently received reviews:

  • Arthur Symons: Poet, Critic, Vagabond — Edited by Elisa Bizzotto and Stefano Evangelista, ‘The book is clearly a timely contribution to our knowledge of Symons and represents a significant milestone in his ongoing critical retrieval.’ — Rob Harris, Studies in Walter Pater and Aestheticism 5, 2020, 140-44
  • A Modernist in Exile: The International Reception of H. G. Adler (1910-1988) — Edited by Lynn L. Wolff, ‘A very impressive collection of moving and thought-provoking essays... Because the contributors to this book have such detailed and specialized knowledge of H. G.’s life and work, and such a masterly ability to contextualize his wide-ranging achievement and relate their new work to earlier critical work, they set a new standard in Adler scholarship. Consequently this fascinating volume will doubtless enhance H. G.’s reputation both as an intellectual and as a writer of prose fiction, and become necessary reading for anyone who has any kind of interest in him and his work.’ — Richard Sheppard, Journal of European Studies 50.3, Autumn 2020, 295–301 (full text online)
  • Scenographies of Perception: Sensuousness in Hegel, Novalis, Rilke, and Proust — Christian Jany, ‘Christian Jany’s Scenographies of Perception situates itself on well-traversed philosophical territory, but with a freshness unusual in a volume devoted to longstanding issues in the history of philosophy and theories of poetry and literature... A thought-provoking, cross-disciplinary account of the relationship between thought and perception that ought to appeal to students of German idealism and ro- manticism and their aftermath in the 20th century, and in a way that stays admirably close to the relevant texts and the concerns that animate them.’ — James D. Reid, Monatshefte 112.3, 2020, 555-57
  • The Poetics of Early Russian Crime Fiction 1860-1917: Deciphering Stories of Detection — Claire Whitehead, ‘An intricately researched and fascinating exploration of the origins and development of a forgotten genre... Whitehead’s re- evaluation of Dostoevskii’s novels (including Brothers Karamazov) as crime literature is rewarding and insightful. Even more valuable, however, is her analysis of Dostoevskii’s forgotten peers, who created the landmarks of this fluid and reactive genre.’ — Muireann Maguire, Slavonic and East European Review 90.4, October 2020, 767-69 (full text online)
  • Francisco Nieva: Coronada y el toro — Edited by Komla Aggor, ‘La Modern Humanities Research Association acaba de publicar una excelente edición de la obra de Francisco Nieva, Coronada y el toro, preparada por el investigador experto en la obra de Nieva, Komla Aggor.’www.francisconieva.com September 2020
  • Eliza Haywood, The Fortunate Foundlings — Edited by Carol Stewart, ‘A key addition to Haywood scholarship, doing much to show her adroit handling of different genres as well as offering a new perspective on an author about whom there is still much to discover.’ — Jennifer Buckley, Modern Language Review 115.4, October 2020, 902-03 (full text online)
  • Marmontel and Demoustier, Le Misanthrope corrigé: Two Eighteenth-Century Sequels to Molière’s ‘Le Misanthrope’ — Edited by Joseph Harris, ‘Harris’s Introduction is essential reading. It provides a nuanced and fine-grained analysis of the two treatments, placing them into the context of the respective authors’ careers and the wider context of eighteenth-century ideas... the volume is a very welcome publication and is sure to be of great interest to a wide audience interested in Molière and his literary posterity.’ — Mark Darlow, Modern Language Review 115.4, October 2020, 917-18 (full text online)
  • Reading Dante and Proust by Analogy — Julia Caterina Hartley, ‘Hartley’s book contributes significantly to the fields of Dante and Proust stu- dies. Moreover, it is persuasive in demonstrating the rich productive potential of this dynamic, interactive approach, setting an important example for literary comparisons to come.’ — Valentina Mele, Modern Language Review 115.4, October 2020, 891-92 (full text online)
  • Thinking Cinema with Proust — Patrick ffrench, ‘Thinking cinema ‘with and through Proust’, this brilliant book unravels manifold new connections, resonances, and echoes across diverse fields of knowledge, demonstrating amply that the chapter of Proust’s relation to cinema is far from being closed.’ — Marion Schmid, Modern Language Review 115.4, October 2020, 922-23 (full text online)
  • Swinburne’s Style: An Experiment in Verse History — L. M. Kilbride, ‘Kilbride provides the reader with insightful textual analyses that shed new light on a selection of Swinburne’s poetical works, some of which are canonical, others still fairly neglected.’ — Giovanni Bassi, Modern Language Review 115.4, October 2020, 905-07 (full text online)
  • Francisco Nieva: Coronada y el toro — Edited by Komla Aggor, ‘La prestigiosa editorial asentada en Cambridge Modern Humanities Research Association acaba de publicar una edición de la obra del genio español Francisco Nieva, «Coronada y el Toro», con una magnífica introducción y estudio del especialista en Nieva Komla Aggor, profesor de la Texas Christian University. «Coronada y el Toro» es una obra maestra.’ — Martín-Miguel Rubio Esteban, ABC 29 September 2020, 14
  • Eliza Haywood, The Fortunate Foundlings — Edited by Carol Stewart, ‘Carol Stewart’s new edition is of exceptional value. The volume is consistently and expertly footnoted. Historical personages are briefly identified, and likely references are offered. More importantly, Stewart’s introduction provides a brief but clear historical summary, a useful contextualization of the text in Haywood’s oeuvre, and a thoughtful analysis of the novel’s key features.’ — Matthew J. Rigilano, Eighteenth-Century Fiction 33.1, 2020, 168-71
  • Reading Dante and Proust by Analogy — Julia Caterina Hartley, ‘Hartley’s erudite, persuasive, and reader-friendly book is a powerful debut, an irresistible invitation to love literature. I confidently look forward to her future work.’ — Thomas Pavel, Modern Philology 24 August 2020 (full text online)
  • Translating Petrarch's Poetry: L’Aura del Petrarca from the Quattrocento to the 21st Century — Edited by Carole Birkan-Berz, Guillaume Coatalen and Thomas Vuong, ‘Ranging through five centuries of translations, adaptations and imitations of Petrarch, the father of Humanism, this transcultural, transdisciplinary study considers the echoes of this major figure, whose reach goes beyond borders, eras and literary genres to resonate singularly into our times and in our own resonating ears.’ — Robert Sheppard, Pages 16 September 2020
  • Comparative Literature in Britain: National Identities, Transnational Dynamics 1800-2000 — Joep Leerssen, ‘This is a study of the rare kind of which it can truthfully be said that it is definitive: the description fits Leerssen’s book perfectly. To those still living who launched comparative literature in the new universities some 50 years ago it will come as a happy reminder of an exciting time of innovation and change which they were fortunate to have been part of. To those of a later generation it will reveal that what happened in the 1960s did not emerge from nowhere: a long and honourable history, ably explored by Professor Leerssen, led up to it.’ — John Fletcher, Journal of European Studies 50.3, 2020, 302-321 (full text online)
  • The Rise of Spanish American Poetry 1500-1700: Literary and Cultural Transmission in the New World — Edited by Rodrigo Cacho Casal and Imogen Choi, ‘En conjunto, The Rise of Spanish American Poetry supone una extraordinaria selección de aportaciones al estudio de los textos coloniales y sus relaciones culturales en un contexto transatlántico.’ — Víctor Sierra Matute, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 97.6, 2020, 1070-1071
  • Pepetela and the MPLA: The Ethical Evolution of a Revolutionary Writer — Phillip Rothwell, ‘The result is a deft, nuanced and accomplished analysis not only of Pepetela and his most important works, but of contemporary Angola and the way that the MPLA has wielded its power... It is a landmark work of scholarship from one of the field’s most accomplished critics, and essential reading for scholars of Lusophone African cultures, Angolan social history and Luso-Brazilian and African literatures.’ — Lanie Millar, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 97.6, 2020, 1069-1070
  • The Multilingual Muse: Transcultural Poetics in the Burgundian Netherlands — Edited by Adrian Armstrong and Elsa Strietman, ‘This is an exciting volume which sheds important light on multilingualism in the world of the Burgundian Netherlands during the late Middle Ages.’ — Albrecht Classen, Mediaevistik 31, 2018, 465-67
  • José Saramago: History, Utopia, and the Necessity of Error — Mark Sabine, ‘From a broad perspective which accepts the idea of an inherent political project and its utopian message, this book excellently resumes the possible justifications, together with scholarly well founded contextualizations, thus offering an outstandingly solid basis from which to depart towards further fruitful debates.’ — Burghard Baltrusch, Portuguese Studies 36.1, July 2020, 115-19 (full text online)
  • Intellectual Life and Literature at Solovki 1923-1930: The Paris of the Northern Concentration Camps — Andrea Gullotta, ‘Gullotta’s commendable study opens up a new area of Gulag research and adds considerably to our knowledge of the literature of the Soviet labour camps.’ — Sarah J. Young, Slavonic and East European Review 98.3, July 2020, 563-65 (full text online)