Caroline Literature

Edited by Rory Loughnane, Andrew J. Power and Peter Sillitoe

Yearbook of English Studies 44

Modern Humanities Research Association

1 January 2014  •  309pp

ISBN: 978-1-781881-45-3 (paperback)

Access online: At JSTOR

RenaissanceEnglishDramaPoetryFiction


The Yearbook of English Studies for 2014 is devoted to Caroline literature, a period of English writing (1625–49) falling between the Jacobean period and the Interregnum. The volume, edited by Rory Loughnane, Andrew J. Power and Peter Sillitoe, includes fourteen invited essays from established and emerging scholars of the period, with each contributor discussing a particular aspect of Caroline literary activity. Despite the wealth of writing produced in this period, Caroline literature has not been as widely studied as the acknowledged ‘golden age’ that preceded it. Indeed, until recently, much critical emphasis had focused on how these writings pre-empt the ruptures of civil war to come. The present volume offers a timely corrective to such a narrow view of this exciting period of writing.

The volume is divided into three sections, on drama, poetry and prose, ranging from performances at the playhouses in London to the emergence of travel writing in this period. The drama section includes essays on the repertories and activities at popular outdoor playhouses such as the Globe and the Red Bull, as well as indoor playhouses such as Blackfriars, Salisbury Court and the Cockpit. This section concludes with a discussion of the reasons for, and impact of, the closure of the theatres in 1642. Several other essays focus on theatrical performances outside the playhouses, from masques at court to royal progresses. In the poetry section, Robert Herrick emerges as a major figure of interest in all four essays, from his writings about the body, hunger, and the grotesque, to his interactions with the other ‘sons of Ben’. The volume concludes with essays on prose literature of the period, ranging from Milton’s early writings on ecclesiastical polity to pamphlets of martial complaint. The topics and texts discussed in this volume demonstrate the abundant variety of literary output in the Caroline period, from entertainments at court to cheap print for the masses. Contributors have sought to engage anew with a body of literature that has been too often overlooked or dismissed, and, in doing so, to challenge the received critical narratives about this period.

Contents:

1-11
Introduction
Rory Loughnane, Andrew J. Power, Peter Sillitoe
doi:10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0001
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12-28
The Caroline Globe
Anthony Parr
doi:10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0012
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29-50
Reputation and the Red Bull Theatre, 1625–42
Rory Loughnane
doi:10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0029
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51-68
Actors, Plays and Performances in the Indoor Playhouses, 1625–42: Boy Players, Leading Men and the Caroline Ensemble
Lucy Munro
doi:10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0051
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69-86
Caroline Court Drama: Forming History
Lauren Shohet
doi:10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0069
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87-102
‘And afterward to his pallace of Westminster, there to solace himself’: Rediscovering the Progresses of Charles I
Peter Sillitoe
doi:10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0087
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103-119
The Closure of the Theatres
Gabriel Egan
doi:10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0103
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120-136
Classical Liberty and Cavalier Poetics: The Politics of Literary Community in Caroline London from Jonson to Marvell
Nicholas McDowell
doi:10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0120
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137-155
The Caroline Grotesque in Verse: Robert Herrick, Richard Flecknoe and John Taylor
L. E. Semler
doi:10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0137
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156-173
Heaven and Hell in Robert Herrick's Body of Work
Andrew J. Power
doi:10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0156
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174-195
Symbolic Consumption and the Rebellious Belly: Demystifying Hunger in Caroline Poetry
Stella Achilleos
doi:10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0174
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196-214
Milton and Caroline Church Government
Elizabeth Sauer
doi:10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0196
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215-231
The Caroline Sermon: Texts, Contexts, and Challenges
Mark Sweetnam
doi:10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0215
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232-248
Mars Rising: Army Pamphlets and London Culture post-1642
Vimala C. Pasupathi
doi:10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0232
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249-264
‘To sleep, perchance to Dream’: The Politics of Travel in the 1630s
Claire Jowitt
doi:10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0249
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265-294
Bibliography
Rory Loughnane, Andrew J. Power, Peter Sillitoe
doi:10.5699/yearenglstud.44.2014.0265
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Bibliography entry:

Loughnane, Rory, Andrew J. Power, and Peter Sillitoe (eds), Caroline Literature (= Yearbook of English Studies, 44.1 (2014))

First footnote reference: 35 Caroline Literature, ed. by Rory Loughnane, Andrew J. Power and Peter Sillitoe (= Yearbook of English Studies, 44.1 (2014)), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Loughnane, Power, and Sillitoe, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Loughnane, Rory, Andrew J. Power, and Peter Sillitoe (eds). 2014. Caroline Literature (= Yearbook of English Studies, 44.1)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Loughnane, Power, and Sillitoe 2014: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Loughnane, Power, and Sillitoe 2014: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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