Translating Petrarch's Poetry
L’Aura del Petrarca from the Quattrocento to the 21st Century

Edited by Carole Birkan-Berz, Guillaume Coatalen and Thomas Vuong

Transcript 8

Legenda

17 February 2020  •  292pp

ISBN: 978-1-781886-63-2 (hardback)  •  RRP £80, $110, €95

ISBN: 978-1-781886-64-9 (paperback, 20 August 2022)  •  RRP £13.49, $17.99, €16.49

ISBN: 978-1-781886-65-6 (JSTOR ebook)

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Petrarch is arguably the most influential poet in Western culture. Throughout the centuries, other poets have imitated him or drawn inspiration from what they know of his work: his poetry has been discussed, set to music, illustrated, fictionalized, parodied, cannibalized. Furthermore, through translations of Petrarch, the sonnet has soared across Europe, remodelling its poetic landscape - so much so that even the most avant-garde poetry still finds itself in debt to the author of the Canzoniere.

Ranging through five centuries of translations, adaptations and imitations of the father of Humanism, this transcultural, transdisciplinary study considers the echoes of a major figure, whose reach goes beyond borders and eras to resonate singularly into our times.

Carole Birkan-Berz is Senior Lecturer in Translation and Literature at the Sorbonne Nouvelle, Guillaume Coatalen Senior Lecturer in Early Modern English Literature at the University of Cergy-Pontoise and Thomas Vuong holds a doctorate in Comparative Literature from the University Paris-13 (Sorbonne-Paris-Cité).

Reviews:

  • ‘Ranging through five centuries of translations, adaptations and imitations of Petrarch, the father of Humanism, this transcultural, transdisciplinary study considers the echoes of this major figure, whose reach goes beyond borders, eras and literary genres to resonate singularly into our times and in our own resonating ears.’ — Robert Sheppard, Pages 16 September 2020
  • ‘Translating Petrarch’s Poetry is a must-read book for anybody interested in the spread of Petrarch’s poetry in the Western world (and beyond) throughout modernity. It collects very thorough essays dealing with this theme in always original and engaging manners from a variety of modern critical standpoints.’ — Enrico Minardi, Annali d'Italianistica 38, 2020, 455-459
  • ‘As its title suggests, this volume covers both “translating” in a conventional sense and freer, sometimes distanced, responses that are nevertheless redolent of Petrarch’s “aura” or distinctive atmosphere and of his portrayal of his beloved. By integrating a wide gamut of approaches on the part of academics from different disciplines and of poets, the collection of case studies presented here illustrates very effectively the endlessly imaginative ways in which Petrarch’s poetry has been transformed and repurposed across time.’ — Brian Richardson, Speculum 96.4, October 2021, 1153-54 (full text online)
  • ‘This collection of fifteen essays by scholars and writers from a range of countries brings to bear on Petrarch recent interest not only in translation as normally conceived but also in reformulations and fragmentations of the original and its appropriation in other media, and in the roles translations and other responses play and have played socially and culturally.’ — Peter Hainsworth, Modern Language Review 117.3, July 2022, 505-07 (full text online)

Contents:

ix-x
Acknowledgements
Carole Birkan-Berz, Guillaume Coatalen, Thomas Vuong
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.3
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xi-xiv
List of Contributors
Carole Birkan-Berz, Guillaume Coatalen, Thomas Vuong
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.4
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1-10
Introduction
Carole Birkan-Berz, Guillaume Coatalen, Thomas Vuong
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.5
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13-30
Chapter 1 Petrarch in Parts: Scattered Rhymes in Sixteenth-Century English Books
Chris Stamatakis
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.6
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31-47
Chapter 2 the New Asclepius: Fragmentation and Reassemblage in Du Bellay’s L’olive
Myron McShane
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.7
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48-62
Chapter 3 Petrarch and the French Reception of the Triumphi: An Age of Transition
Alessandro Turbil
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.8
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63-81
Chapter 4 the Translation of Lexical-Semantic Elements in Enrique Garcés’s Los Sonetos Y Canciones Del Petrarcha: the Case of Sestina Rvf 30
Francisco José Rodríguez Mesa
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.9
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82-102
Chapter 5 Translating the Canzoniere Into Images: the Petrarca Queriniano Incunable
Giulia Zava
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.10
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103-124
Chapter 6 Petrarch and the Pastoral Design of Luca Marenzio’s Madrigali A Quattro Voci […] Libro Primo (1585)
Massimo Ossi
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.11
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127-138
Chapter 7 Georges and Madeleine De Scudéry: Two Polite Commentators of Petrarch
Dominique Chaigne
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.12
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139-151
Chapter 8 the Untranslatable Laura: Nineteenth-Century French Perspectives
Jennifer Rushworth
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.13
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152-170
Chapter 9 Orpheus Versus Hermes: On A Few Twentieth-Century French Translators of the Canzoniere
Riccardo Raimondo
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.14
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171-190
Chapter 10 Echoes of the Petrarchan Innamoramento in Tim Atkins’s Petrarch Collected and Emmanuel Hocquard’s Un Test De Solitude: Two Poets Between Subversion and Dialogue
Thomas Vuong
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.15
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191-206
Chapter 11 ‘Petrarch’s Love Clangs Her Triumphal Car’: Following Petrarch in Geoffrey Hill’s Mid- To Later Work
Carole Birkan-Berz
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.16
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209-214
Chapter 12 How Petrarch Can Speak To Contemporary Poetry: Yves Bonnefoy As Petrarch Translator and Critic
Thomas Vuong
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.17
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215-221
Chapter 13 Elements of the History of the Sonnet From Its Italian Sources: Formal Aspects
Jacques Roubaud
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.18
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222-244
Chapter 14 Seven Types of Translation: An Overview and Arrangement of Avant-Garde Translation Practice With Reference To Tim Atkins’s Petrarch Collected Atkins
Tim Atkins
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.19
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245-262
Chapter 15 ‘Era Il Giorno Ch’al Sol Si Scoloraro’: A Derivative Dérive Into/out of Petrarch’s Sonnet 3
Robert Sheppard
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.20
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263-270
Appendix: Europetrarca: the Relevance of A Database of Translations of the Canzoniere
Guillaume Coatalen
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.21
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271-278
Index
Carole Birkan-Berz, Guillaume Coatalen, Thomas Vuong
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16kkxw0.22
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Bibliography entry:

Birkan-Berz, Carole, Guillaume Coatalen, and Thomas Vuong (eds), Translating Petrarch's Poetry: L’Aura del Petrarca from the Quattrocento to the 21st Century, Transcript, 8 (Legenda, 2020)

First footnote reference: 35 Translating Petrarch's Poetry: L’Aura del Petrarca from the Quattrocento to the 21st Century, ed. by Carole Birkan-Berz, Guillaume Coatalen and Thomas Vuong, Transcript, 8 (Legenda, 2020), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Birkan-Berz, Coatalen, and Vuong, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Birkan-Berz, Carole, Guillaume Coatalen, and Thomas Vuong (eds). 2020. Translating Petrarch's Poetry: L’Aura del Petrarca from the Quattrocento to the 21st Century, Transcript, 8 (Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Birkan-Berz, Coatalen, and Vuong 2020: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Birkan-Berz, Coatalen, and Vuong 2020: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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