After Clarice
Reading Lispector’s Legacy in the Twenty-First Century

Edited by Adriana X. Jacobs and Claire Williams

Transcript 14

Legenda

13 September 2022  •  466pp

ISBN: 978-1-781888-59-9 (hardback)  •  RRP £85, $115, €99

ISBN: 978-1-781888-60-5 (paperback, forthcoming)

ISBN: 978-1-781888-61-2 (JSTOR ebook)

Access online: Books@JSTOR

PortugueseFiction


Forty years after her death, Clarice Lispector’s startling oeuvre continues to fascinate readers and scholars. Internationally acclaimed writers, from Hélène Cixous to Colm Tóibín, have acknowledged the transformative influence of her writing on their own work. Translations of her novels and short stories appear every year in many languages, making her one of the most widely translated and retranslated Portuguese-language writers of the twentieth century. After Clarice: Reading Lispector’s Legacy in the Twenty-First Century brings together scholars, authors, artists, and translators working in a wide range of languages and disciplines to address Lispector’s place, as a Brazilian writer, in twenty-first century configurations of world literature. It aims to evaluate the fluctuations and swerves in Lispector’s critical fortunes, focusing on the way her works have been reread and transformed in other languages, genres, and media.

Gathering scholarly articles, works of fiction and poetry, personal essays and archival material, this volume explores Lispector’s status as a Jewish writer; issues of identity, class, race, gender and sexuality in her work; translation and reception, as well as the politics of publishing and marketing Lispector for international readerships. In addition to her stories and novels, After Clarice also examines Lispector’s journalism, writing for children, interviews, music and visual art collaborations, and considers how these activities have garnered her new readers in a wide range of disciplines.

Reviews:

  • ‘Hefty tomes such as After Clarice are becoming ever rarer... This expansive collection of essays on the life and works of Clarice Lispector is a welcome exception. Readers wishing to know just a little more about Lispector, or any of her works, as well as those curious to learn more about a particular intricacy regarding the critical reception of her work, are equally well served. Others, of course, might opt to read the book cover to cover. If they do, they will receive a comprehensive education on one of the most fascinating writers of the twentieth century.’ — Paulo de Medeiros, Modern Language Review 119.2, 2024, 283-84 (full text online)

Contents:

1
Introduction: Afterthoughts and Afterwords
Adriana Jacobs, Claire Williams
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2
A Walk through Clarice’s Leme: One of the ‘O Rio de Clarice’ Guided Tours
Teresa Montero
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3
In Search of Belonging: Places and Non-places in Correspondências and Minhas queridas
Laís Botler
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4
Bridging the Imaginary Gap between Distant Cartographies: The Visit that Never Was
Dafna Hornike
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5
Clarice Lispector’s Unsettling Archive
Elvia Bezerra
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6
And Now: A crônica about my Encounter with the Manuscripts of The Hour of the Star
Paloma Vidal
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7
Clarice Lispector the Conference Speaker: The Vanguard and the Right to Narrate
Nádia Battella Gotlib
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8
Introduction: Pontiero’s Lost/Last Translation
Claire Williams
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9
‘Prender um inefável’: Affect in Clarice’s Fictions
Marta Peixoto
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10
‘My Error Is My Mirror’: Clarice Lispector’s Jewish Rhetoric of Mistakes
Yael Segalovitz
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11
‘The error had often become my path’: Lispector, Cixous and Ways of Reading
Julie Côté
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12
Clarice Lispector and World Literature: Is The Hour of the Star a Global Novel?
Nelson H. Vieira
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13
Clarice: The Visitor
Idra Novey
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14
After ‘A imitação da Rosa’: Before ‘Capture’
Hélia Correia
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15
Spectres of Clarice: Lispector’s Literary Afterlives
Claire Williams
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16
Rewriting Clarice Lispector in the Digital Age
Karyn Mota
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17
Writing Life beyond the Humanist Subject in The Hour of the Star and A Breath of Life
Kelli D. Zaytoun
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18
Reflections in the Porta-espelho: Clarice Lispector’s Literary Theory of the Object
Ami Schiess
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19
Lispector and the Illogic of Matter
Martin MacInnes
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20
The Mute Wide-Open Eye of All Things
Kiran Leonard
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21
Clarice Lispector: ‘Unreal like Music’
Carlos Mendes de Sousa
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22
The Body Speaks: Clarice Lispector on Screen
Magdalena Edwards
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23
Que(e)rying Femininities: Clarice Lispector’s ‘Correio Feminino’ on TV Globo
Mariela Méndez
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24
Mutatis Mutandis: Communicating Absence
Sara André da Costa
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25
Clarice Hebraica
Adriana X. Jacobs
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26
Marketing Lispector: Life Writing as Literary Criticism
Júlia Braga Neves
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27
Clarice Lispector in English: Translation and Reception
Cynthia Beatrice Costa, Luana Ferreira de Freitas
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28
Counterfeit Clarices: Performing Lispector
Katrina Dodson
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29
We Are All Children of Babel: On Clarice Lispector’s Chinese Translation
Min Xuefei
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Bibliography entry:

Jacobs, Adriana X., and Claire Williams (eds), After Clarice: Reading Lispector’s Legacy in the Twenty-First Century, Transcript, 14 (Legenda, 2022)

First footnote reference: 35 After Clarice: Reading Lispector’s Legacy in the Twenty-First Century, ed. by Adriana X. Jacobs and Claire Williams, Transcript, 14 (Legenda, 2022), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Jacobs and Williams, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Jacobs, Adriana X., and Claire Williams (eds). 2022. After Clarice: Reading Lispector’s Legacy in the Twenty-First Century, Transcript, 14 (Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Jacobs and Williams 2022: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Jacobs and Williams 2022: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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