Writing Russian Lives
The Poetics and Politics of Biography in Modern Russian Culture

Edited by Polly Jones

Slavonic and East European Review 96.1

Modern Humanities Research Association and the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College London

15 February 2018

ISBN: 978-1-781887-47-9 (paperback)

ISBN: 978-1-781889-10-7 (paperback)  •  RRP £15, $20, €17

Sample: Google Books  •  Access online: At JSTOR


Like many genres, biography came belatedly to Russia. As with other such late arrivals, it underwent intensive growth in quantity, sophistication, cultural significance and popularity from the era of Nicholas I onwards, and stands today as a dominant force in post-Soviet publishing. Yet studies of Russian biography’s poetics and its role as a literary and cultural institution in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries remain thin on the ground, a fact often lamented, yet not fully addressed, in the scattered writings on the subject.

Writing Russian Lives examines modern Russian biography as a literary form, a publishing phenomenon and a cultural force. From Imperial to pre- Revolutionary and early Soviet biography and memoir writing, the volume also explores the history of the long-running ‘Lives of Remarkable People’ series, whilst consideration of survivors’ testimonies from Nazi-occupied Russia and the problems of presenting personality in the late Soviet era offer innovative research and insight into less traditional forms of the genre.

This volume is available both as a stand-alone paperback book and an issue of the journal.

Contents:

1-15
The Poetics and Politics of Modern Russian Biography
Polly Jones
doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.96.1.0001
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16-40
Biography as Archive: Writing the Lives of Scholars in Imperial Russia
Nathaniel Knight
doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.96.1.0016
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41-66
Creating a National Biographical Series: F. F. Pavlenkov's ‘Lives of Remarkable People’, 1890–1924
Ludmilla A. Trigos, Carol Ueland
doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.96.1.0041
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67-93
‘Remembrances of a Distant Past’: Generational Memory and the Collective Auto/Biography of Russian Populists in the Revolutionary Era
Ben Eklof, Tatiana Saburova
doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.96.1.0067
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94-116
Lives and Facts: Biography in Russia in the 1920s
Angela Brintlinger
doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.96.1.0094
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117-143
The Antifascist Pact: Forging a First Experience of Nazi Occupation in the Wartime Soviet Union
Jochen Hellbeck
doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.96.1.0117
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144-173
‘Life as big as the ocean’: Bolshevik Biography and the Problem of Personality from Late Stalinism to Late Socialism
Polly Jones
doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.96.1.0144
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Rights to this title are held by School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College London.


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