The Poetry of Céline Arnauld
From Dada to Ultra-Modern

Ruth Hemus

Research Monographs in French Studies 58

Legenda

28 September 2020  •  184pp

ISBN: 978-1-781888-31-5 (hardback)  •  RRP £80, $110, €95

ISBN: 978-1-781888-32-2 (paperback, 22 January 2023)  •  RRP £10.99, $14.99, €13.49

ISBN: 978-1-781888-33-9 (JSTOR ebook)

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The poet Céline Arnauld (1885-1952) was at the heart of Paris Dada. Her experimental texts appeared in the most prominent avant-garde journals and she published almost a dozen books. Yet Arnauld predicted as early as 1924 that she would be written out of history. Isolated by personal loss and financially insecure, she took her own life in 1952. Her story is one of an individual with an elusive identity — she was a Jewish émigré, born Carolina Goldstein in Romania — who left behind a body of work rich in innovation. In this study, Ruth Hemus conveys the pleasure of discovering this neglected figure and her inventive writing. Charting one woman’s navigation of the avant-garde over a thirty-year period (1918-1948), she sets out Arnauld’s quest for an autonomous poetry that she herself called ‘ultra-modern.’

Ruth Hemus is a Reader in French and Visual Arts at Royal Holloway, University of London.

Contents:

1-8
Introduction: the Mysterious Case of Céline Arnauld
Ruth Hemus
doi:10.2307/j.ctv1wsgqv9.4
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11-21
Chapter 1 From Romania To Paris: La Lanterne Magique (1914)
Ruth Hemus
doi:10.2307/j.ctv1wsgqv9.5
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22-34
Chapter 2 Contesting the Novel: Tournevire (1919)
Ruth Hemus
doi:10.2307/j.ctv1wsgqv9.6
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35-46
Chapter 3 Collision and Collage in Poèmes À Claires-Voies (1920)
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doi:10.2307/j.ctv1wsgqv9.7
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47-58
Chapter 4 Liminal Spaces and Refrains in Point De Mire (1921)
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doi:10.2307/j.ctv1wsgqv9.8
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61-73
Chapter 5 Dada Actions: Magazines and Manifestos (1920–21)
Ruth Hemus
doi:10.2307/j.ctv1wsgqv9.9
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74-84
Chapter 6 Founding A Journal: Ambition and Vision in Projecteur (1920)
Ruth Hemus
doi:10.2307/j.ctv1wsgqv9.10
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85-98
Chapter 7 Battles With Breton: ‘Les Faux Managers’ (1924) and Projectivism
Ruth Hemus
doi:10.2307/j.ctv1wsgqv9.11
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101-114
Chapter 8 the Lyric Traveller: Longing and Belonging in Guêpier De Diamants (1923) and ‘Diorama’ (1925)
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doi:10.2307/j.ctv1wsgqv9.12
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115-126
Chapter 9 Music and Madness in La Nuit Rêve Tout Haut Et Le Clavier Secret (1934)
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doi:10.2307/j.ctv1wsgqv9.13
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127-138
Chapter 10 Cycles of Time and Nature in Heures Intactes (1936) and Les Réseaux Du Réveil (1937)
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doi:10.2307/j.ctv1wsgqv9.14
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139-150
Chapter 11 War, Exile, and Precarious Peace: La Nuit Pleure Tout Haut (1939) and Rien Qu’une Étoile, Suivi De Plains-Chants Sauvages (1948)
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doi:10.2307/j.ctv1wsgqv9.15
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151-158
Conclusion: A Triple Margin: Gender, Nationality, and Ultra-Modernity
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doi:10.2307/j.ctv1wsgqv9.16
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159-168
Bibliography
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doi:10.2307/j.ctv1wsgqv9.17
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169-174
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Bibliography entry:

Hemus, Ruth, The Poetry of Céline Arnauld: From Dada to Ultra-Modern, Research Monographs in French Studies, 58 (Legenda, 2020)

First footnote reference: 35 Ruth Hemus, The Poetry of Céline Arnauld: From Dada to Ultra-Modern, Research Monographs in French Studies, 58 (Legenda, 2020), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Hemus, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Hemus, Ruth. 2020. The Poetry of Céline Arnauld: From Dada to Ultra-Modern, Research Monographs in French Studies, 58 (Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Hemus 2020: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Hemus 2020: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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