E.T.A. Hoffmann’s Orient
Romantic Aesthetics and the German Imagination

Joanna Neilly

Germanic Literatures 11

Legenda

19 December 2016  •  168pp

ISBN: 978-1-909662-98-8 (hardback)  •  RRP £80, $110, €95

ISBN: 978-1-781883-09-9 (paperback, 30 September 2018)  •  RRP £9.99, $13.50, €12.50

ISBN: 978-1-781883-10-5 (JSTOR ebook)

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The German Romantics were fascinated by the Orient and its potential to inspire poetic creation. E.T.A. Hoffmann was no exception: across the wide range of his work as an author, composer, and music critic, the Orient is a persistent topic. In particular, Hoffmann creatively absorbed the influence of the imagined Orient – its popular European reception – on German literature, music, and scholarship. Joanna Neilly’s study considers for the first time the breadth and nuance of Hoffmann’s particular brand of orientalism, examining the significance of his oriental characters and themes for a new understanding of nineteenth-century cultural production. A self-reflexive writer who kept a keen eye on contemporary trends, Hoffmann is at the forefront of discussions about cultural transfer and its implications for the modern artist.

Joanna Neilly is Lecturer in German at Wadham College, Oxford.

Reviews:

  • ‘A thorough and innovative monograph... E.T.A. Hoffmann’s Orient is a well-written study that serves an indispensable function as a comprehensive and careful survey of the theme of orientalism in Hoffmann’s works. Neilly is ready to criticize Hoffmann’s orientalism when necessary, but what is more important, she is also receptive to those aspects of Hoffmann that cannot be reduced to orientalist discourse or are even critical of orientalism.’ — Asko Nivala, European Romantic Review August 2018 (full text online)
  • ‘The book is written in a clear, crisp style... It is rich, dense, and full of insight and overall an important and original addition not only to the body of Hoffmann scholarship; it also adds an important facet to our understanding of the Romantic preoccupation with the Orient.’ — Juergen Barkhoff, Modern Language Review 114.4, October 2019, 886-87 (full text online)
  • ‘Hoffmann has until now been presented as something of a peripheral Orientalist, with more attention typically being paid to Schlegel and Novalis. Neilly’s searching study serves as a thoughtful corrective, revealing across a series of close readings the range and variety of Eastern motifs that are implied and appropriated in Hoffmann’s fictions, or—as is most often, and most intriguingly, the case—critically reflected upon, in a way that turns his ironic mirror back onto German aesthetics and indeed onto the notion of the fixed self.’ — Polly Dickson, German Studies Review 43.3, October 2020, 607-10 (full text online)

Contents:

ix-ix

Acknowledgements
J.N
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16km0b4.3

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x-x

Abbreviations
Joanna Neilly
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16km0b4.4

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xi-xii

Note On Editions, Translations, and Permissions
Joanna Neilly
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16km0b4.5

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1-18

Introduction
Joanna Neilly
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16km0b4.6

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20-44

Chapter 1 Romantic Realities: Oriental Spaces and the Modern German Setting
Joanna Neilly
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16km0b4.7

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45-70

Chapter 2 Romantic Divisions: the Mind/body Problem and the Oriental Cure
Joanna Neilly
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16km0b4.8

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71-94

Chapter 3 Romantic Heroines: Oriental Women, Bourgeois Girls, and the Critique of the Feminine Ideal
Joanna Neilly
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16km0b4.9

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96-119

Chapter 4 Staging the Orient: Alla Turca and Indian-Style Music
Joanna Neilly
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16km0b4.10

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120-142

Chapter 5 Knowing the Orient: Scholars, Sages, and the Limits of Cultural Transfer
Joanna Neilly
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16km0b4.11

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143-146

Conclusion
Joanna Neilly
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16km0b4.12

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147-154

Bibliography
Joanna Neilly
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16km0b4.13

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155-158

Index
Joanna Neilly
doi:10.2307/j.ctv16km0b4.14

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Bibliography entry:

Neilly, Joanna, E.T.A. Hoffmann’s Orient: Romantic Aesthetics and the German Imagination, Germanic Literatures, 11 (Legenda, 2016)

First footnote reference: 35 Joanna Neilly, E.T.A. Hoffmann’s Orient: Romantic Aesthetics and the German Imagination, Germanic Literatures, 11 (Legenda, 2016), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Neilly, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Neilly, Joanna. 2016. E.T.A. Hoffmann’s Orient: Romantic Aesthetics and the German Imagination, Germanic Literatures, 11 (Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Neilly 2016: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Neilly 2016: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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