Uncanny Valleys
Austrian Literature and Film in the New Millennium

Edited by Heide Kunzelmann and Lyn Marven

Austrian Studies 29

Modern Humanities Research Association

24 December 2021

ISBN: 978-1-781889-72-5 (paperback)

Access online: At JSTOR


‘Uncanny valley’, the dip in credibility of life-like robots when they betray a lack of human response, is a recent coinage, but Sigmund Freud’s influential essay ‘The Uncanny’ goes back as far as 1919. The uncanny experience of feeling fundamentally unhomed, even on home ground, is a core quality of the modern human condition. However ephemeral — triggered perhaps by a glimpse of something strange in a familiar context, or vice versa — the uncanny moment can have a profound psychological impact, and writers and filmmakers have used this to great effect in exposing repressed fears, immoral histories or unpopular truths.

Austrian writers, filmmakers and visual artists after 1945 have been faced with just such unsavoury truths. In the post-war decades, the collective denial of responsibility for National Socialist crimes informed a cultural discourse polarized between the apologetic and the highly judgmental. Towards the turn of the new millennium, however, Austrian culture began to absorb a more integrative point of view — disturbing to either side, and uncanny to the core. Volume 29 of Austrian Studies explores the fiction and film occupying these uncanny valleys, and the contemporary sensibility of which they now form a part.

Volume 29 of Austrian Studies is edited by Heide Kunzelmann and Lyn Marven.

Contents:

1-4
Uncanny Valleys: An Introduction
Heide Kunzelmann, Lyn Marven
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0001
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15-31
Making Sense. In and of Doron Rabinovici
Caitríona Leahy
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0015
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32-46
Lenka Reinerová's Uncanny Encounter with Theresienstadt
Florian Gassner
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0032
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47-67
The Uncanny in Paulus Hochgatterer's Crime Fiction
Christoph Leitgeb
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0047
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68-85
Towards a Decolonial Uncanny: Reconfiguring the Ineffable in Anna Kim's ‘Greenland’ Novel Anatomie einer Nacht (2012)
Teresa Ludden
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0068
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86-101
Austrian Heimat-Horror in Twenty-First-Century Film: Ich seh, ich seh (2014)
Regina Range
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0086
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102-20
Uncanny Women and the Home in Contemporary Austrian Horror Film: Spitzendeckchen (2012), Ich seh, ich seh (2014) and HomeSick (2015)
Maria Hofmann
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0102
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121-43
Unsettling Heimat and the Touristic Ideal: Tropes of the Uncanny in Lois Hechenblaikner's Anti-Heimat Photography
Julia Secklehner
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0121
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144-60
Uncanny Europe: Derridean Hauntologies of History, Unity and Identity in Films by Nikolaus Geyrhalter
Florian Lippert
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0144
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161-65
Obituary: W. E. (Gar) Yates 1938–2021
Ulrike Tanzer
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0161
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166-167
Review of Thomas Martinec, Rilkes Musikalität
Rey Conquer
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0166
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167-169
Review of Silke Uertz-Jacquemain, Rotweißrotes Fleischtheater: Über die Komik in Werner Schwabs Dramen
Marina Rauchenbacher
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0167
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169-171
Review of Rüdiger Görner, Franz Kafkas akustische Welten
Syamala Roberts
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0169
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171-173
Review of Clemens Ruthner, Matthias Schmidt, Die Mutzenbacher: Lektüren und Kontexte eines Skandalromans
Sigurd Paul Scheichl
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0171
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173-174
Review of Ernst Hanisch, Landschaft und Identität: Versuch einer österreichischen Erfahrungsgeschichte
Rebecca Wismeg-Kammerlander
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0173
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175-179
Review of Vreni Amsler, Sophie Reyer, Sophie Reyer, Veza Canetti zwischen Leben und Werk: Netzwerk-Biografie; Sophie Reyer, Vezas Wege: Ein biographischer Roman
Julian Preece
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0175
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179-180
Review of Michael D. Gordin, Einstein in Bohemia
Andrew Barker
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0179
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181-182
Review of Stephen Johnson, The Eighth: Mahler and the World in 1910
Andrew Barker
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0181
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182-184
Review of Tim Mehigan, Robert Musil and the Question of Science: Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Problem of the Two Cultures
Graham Bartram
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0182
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184-186
Review of Rob McFarland, Georg Spitaler, Ingo Zechner, The Red Vienna Sourcebook
Judith Beniston
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0184
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186-188
Review of Gundolf Graml, Revisiting Austria: Tourism, Space, and National Identity, 1945 to the Present
Andrea Capovilla
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0186
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188-192
Review of Jens Malte Fischer, Ari Linden, Karl Kraus. Der Widersprecher. Biografie
Gilbert J. Carr
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0188
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192-194
Review of Gerald Stourzh, Wolfgang Mueller, Der Kampf um den Staatsvertrag 1945–1955: Ost-West-Besetzung, Staatsvertrag und Neutralität Österreichs
R. Knight
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0192
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195-196
Review of Megan Brandow-Faller,
Laura Morowitz
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0195
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197-199
Review of Alys X. George, The Naked Truth: Viennese Modernism and the Body
Annja Neumann
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0197
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199-100
Review of Franz Leander Fillafer, Aufklärung habsburgisch: Staatsbildung, Wissenskultur und Geschichtspolitik in Zentraleuropa 1750‒1850
Ritchie Robertson
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0199
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201-202
Review of Matthias Eck, Masculinities in Austrian Contemporary Literature: Strategic Evasion
Benjamin Schaper
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0201
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203-205
Review of Christin Pschichholz, The First World War as a Caesura? Demographic Concepts, Population Policy, and Genocide in the Late Ottoman, Russian, and Habsburg Spheres
Matthew Stibbe
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0203
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205-207
Review of Robert Knight, Politik der Assimilation: Österreich und die Kärntner Slowenen nach der NS-Herrschaft
Marija Wakounig
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0205
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208-12
Abstracts
Heide Kunzelmann, Lyn Marven
doi:10.5699/austrianstudies.29.2021.0208
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Bibliography entry:

Kunzelmann, Heide, and Lyn Marven (eds), Uncanny Valleys: Austrian Literature and Film in the New Millennium (= Austrian Studies, 29 (2021))

First footnote reference: 35 Uncanny Valleys: Austrian Literature and Film in the New Millennium, ed. by Heide Kunzelmann and Lyn Marven (= Austrian Studies, 29 (2021)), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Kunzelmann and Marven, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Kunzelmann, Heide, and Lyn Marven (eds). 2021. Uncanny Valleys: Austrian Literature and Film in the New Millennium (= Austrian Studies, 29)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Kunzelmann and Marven 2021: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Kunzelmann and Marven 2021: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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