Valentin Rasputin and Soviet Russian Village Prose

David C. Gillespie

MHRA Texts and Dissertations 22

Modern Humanities Research Association

1 January 1986  •  106pp

ISBN: 978-0-947623-08-1 (paperback)  •  RRP £25, $40

ISBN: 978-1-123144-78-9 (Google ebook)  •  RRP £4.95

Sample: Google Books

ContemporaryRussianFiction


The city and the village represent two poles of Soviet society and ideology. The city symbolizes the future; the industrial proletariat is the natural ally of the Party. But the village provides a constant reminder of Russia's past, folklore and spirituality. It is this second theme which Valentin Rasputin, born in a Siberian village in 1937, takes up. Though not prolific he became a widely-read novelist, converting to Christianity in 1980 and ultimately moving to the political right after Glasnost. His novel Farewell to Matyora (1976) is considered a canonical example of 'village prose', an idealised picture of hard but pure farming life among the peasantry shortly to be displaced by the building of a hydroelectric dam.

Bibliography entry:

Gillespie, David C., Valentin Rasputin and Soviet Russian Village Prose, MHRA Texts and Dissertations, 22 (Cambridge: MHRA, 1986)

First footnote reference: 35 David C. Gillespie, Valentin Rasputin and Soviet Russian Village Prose, MHRA Texts and Dissertations, 22 (Cambridge: MHRA, 1986), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Gillespie, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Gillespie, David C.. 1986. Valentin Rasputin and Soviet Russian Village Prose, MHRA Texts and Dissertations, 22 (Cambridge: MHRA)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Gillespie 1986: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Gillespie 1986: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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