Unbinding Medea
Interdisciplinary Approaches to a Classical Myth from Antiquity to the 21st Century

Edited by Heike Bartel and Anne Simon

Legenda (General Series)

Legenda

6 September 2010  •  352pp

ISBN: 978-1-906540-53-1 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ClassicsDrama


Medea — simply to mention her name conjures up echoes and cross-connections from Antiquity to the present. The vengeful wife, the infanticidal mother, the frail, suicidal heroine, the archetypal bad mother, the smitten maiden, the barbarian, the sorceress, the abused victim, the case study for a pathology: for more than two thousand years she has challenged in literature, arrested the eye in paintings, reverberated in music, called to us from the stage. She demands the most interdisciplinary of study, from ancient art to contemporary law, genetics and medicine: she is no more to be bound by any single field of study than by any single take on her character.

Contents:

1-15
Introduction: Medea, Meetings in Borderland
Heike Bartel, Anne Simon
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16-24
Medea and the Mind of the Murderer
Edith Hall
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25-38
How Medea Moves: Versions of a Myth in Apollonius and Elsewhere
Richard Buxton
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39-52
A Stranger in a Strange Land: Medea in Roman Republican Tragedy
Robert Cowan
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53-67
The Representation of Medea in the Roman House
Margherita Carucci
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68-79
‘A New Medea’ in Late Medieval French Narratives
Catherine Léglu
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80-93
Changing Perceptions: Medea as Paradigm of the Ideal Marriage
Ekaterini Kepetzis
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94-112
Medea, Frederick Sandys, and the Aesthetic Moment
Elizabeth Prettejohn
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113-123
John McNaughton’s Wild Things: Pop Culture Echoes of Medea in the 1990s
John Thorburn
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124-135
Retrospectively Medea: The Infanticidal Mother in Alejandro Amenábar’s Film The Others
Isabelle Torrance
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136-147
Revolutionary Medea
Amy Wygant
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148-160
Transformations of Medea on the Eighteenth-Century German Stage
Yixu Lü
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161-175
Dressing the ‘Other’, Dressing the ‘Self’: Clothing in the Medea Dramas of Euripides and Franz Grillparzer
Heike Bartel
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176-185
Jay Scheib’s The Medea as Postdramatic Performance
Peter A. Campbell
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186-194
Three Medeas from Modern Ireland
Brian Arkins
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195-208
Giving Birth to a New Woman: Italian Women Playwrights’ Revisions of Medea
Daniela Cavallaro
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209-223
Myth and Ritual in The Hungry Woman: A Mexican Medea: Cherríe Moraga’s Xicana-Indígena Interpretation of Euripides’ Medea
Paula Straile-Costa
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224-237
Cultural Imperialism and Infanticide in Pasolini’s Medea
Ivar Kvistad
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238-249
Mediation or Refraction? Marie Luise Kaschnitz’s Edition and Reception of Grillparzer’s Medea
Anthony Bushell
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250-262
The Maternal Contract in Beloved and Medea
Hilary Emmett
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263-280
‘A Thoroughly Modern Medea’: The Fear of Female Insubordination in Euripides’ Medea and Contemporary Legislative Policy
Angela J. Burns
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281-294
Legal Myth-Making: Medea and the Legal Representation of the Feminine ‘Other’
Edward Phillips
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295-298
Fatal Outcomes of Fabricated or Induced Illness: A Modern Medea
Terence Stephenson
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299-304
The Medea Gene
Laurence D. Hurst
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Bibliography entry:

Bartel, Heike, and Anne Simon (eds), Unbinding Medea: Interdisciplinary Approaches to a Classical Myth from Antiquity to the 21st Century (Cambridge: Legenda, 2010)

First footnote reference: 35 Unbinding Medea: Interdisciplinary Approaches to a Classical Myth from Antiquity to the 21st Century, ed. by Heike Bartel and Anne Simon (Cambridge: Legenda, 2010), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Bartel and Simon, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Bartel, Heike, and Anne Simon (eds). 2010. Unbinding Medea: Interdisciplinary Approaches to a Classical Myth from Antiquity to the 21st Century (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Bartel and Simon 2010: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Bartel and Simon 2010: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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