Translating Sholem Aleichem
History, Politics and Art

Edited by Gennady Estraikh, Jordan Finkin, Kerstin Hoge and Mikhail Krutikov

Studies In Yiddish 10

Legenda

1 June 2012  •  232pp

ISBN: 978-1-907975-00-4 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ModernYiddishRussianDramaFictionTranslation


Sholem Aleichem, whose 150th anniversary was commemorated in March 2009, remains one of the most popular Yiddish authors. But few people today are able to read the original. Since the 1910s, however, Sholem Aleichem’s works have been known to a wider international audience through numerous translations, and through film and theatre adaptations, most famously Fiddler on the Roof. This volume examines those translations published in Europe, with the aim of investigating how the specific European contexts might have shaped translations of Yiddish literature.

Reviews:

  • ‘I would highly recommend this volume for a range of readers: those interested in issues of translation generally, those who wish to know more about the life and work of this central Yiddish writer, and those desirous of understanding the complexities of translating Yiddish.’ — Leah Garrett, Modern Language Review 109.1, January 2014, 221-22 (full text online)

Contents:

1-5
Introduction
Gennady Estraikh
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6-24
Found in Translation: Sholem Aleichem and the Myth of the Ideal Yiddish Reader
Olga Litvak
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25-46
Sholem Aleichem as a Self-Translator
Alexander Frenkel
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47-61
Sholem Aleichem and the Polish-Jewish Literary Audience
Eugenia Prokop-Janiec
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62-82
Soviet Sholem Aleichem
Gennady Estraikh
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83-97
‘Du host zikh a denkmol af eybik geshtelt’: The Sovietization and Heroization of Sholem Aleichem in the 1939 Jubilee Poems
Roland Gruschka
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98-112
A Man for All Seasons: Translating Sholem Aleichem into Soviet Ideological Idiom
Mikhail Krutikov
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113-133
Four English Pots and the Evolving Translatability of Sholem Aleichem
Gabriella Safran
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134-149
On (Un)Translatability: Sholem Aleichem’s Ayznban-geshikhtes (Railroad Stories) in German Translation
Sabine Koller
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150-164
Laughing Matters: Translation and Irony in ‘Der gliklekhster in Kodne’
Alexandra Hoffman
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165-181
Lost in Marienbad: On the Literary Use of the Linguistic Openness of Yiddish
Kerstin Hoge
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182-198
Sholem Aleichem in Estonian: Creating a Tradition
Anna Verschik
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199-214
Speaking Tevye der milkhiker in Translation: Performance, Humour, and World Literature
Jan Schwarz
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Bibliography entry:

Estraikh, Gennady, Jordan Finkin, Kerstin Hoge, and Mikhail Krutikov (eds), Translating Sholem Aleichem: History, Politics and Art, Studies In Yiddish, 10 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2012)

First footnote reference: 35 Translating Sholem Aleichem: History, Politics and Art, ed. by Gennady Estraikh, Jordan Finkin, Kerstin Hoge and Mikhail Krutikov, Studies In Yiddish, 10 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2012), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Estraikh, Finkin, Hoge, and Krutikov, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Estraikh, Gennady, Jordan Finkin, Kerstin Hoge, and Mikhail Krutikov (eds). 2012. Translating Sholem Aleichem: History, Politics and Art, Studies In Yiddish, 10 (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Estraikh, Finkin, Hoge, and Krutikov 2012: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Estraikh, Finkin, Hoge, and Krutikov 2012: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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