Three Cities of Yiddish
St Petersburg, Warsaw and Moscow

Edited by Gennady Estraikh and Mikhail Krutikov

Studies In Yiddish 15

Legenda

3 April 2017  •  212pp

ISBN: 978-1-910887-07-3 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ISBN: 978-1-781883-36-5 (paperback, 30 September 2018)  •  RRP £9.99, $12.50, €12.50

ISBN: 978-1-781883-37-2 (JSTOR ebook)

Access online: Books@JSTOR

YiddishFictionHistorystudent-priced


In addition to its original library hardback edition, this title is now on sale in the new student-priced Legenda paperback range.


This volume borrows its title from the first international Yiddish bestseller, Sholem Asch’s epic trilogy Three Cities. Whereas Asch portrayed Jewish life in St Petersburg, Warsaw and Moscow at the crucial historical moment of the collapse of the Russian Empire, this volume examines the variety of Yiddish publishing, educational, literary, academic, and theatrical activities in the former imperial metropolises from the late nineteenth through to the late twentieth century, and explores the representations of those cities in Yiddish literature.

Gennady Estraikh is Associate Professor of Yiddish Studies, New York University. Mikhail Krutikov is Professor of Slavic and Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan.

Reviews:

  • ‘The British book series “Studies in Yiddish,” published by Legenda (and known among academics as “the Legenda series”), is in my estimation the most important venue for contemporary research on Yiddish literature and culture in the world today... Krutikov deals with the travelogue Hoyptshtet (Capital Cities) of 1934, written by Der Nister (“The Hidden One”), one of the greatest Soviet-Yiddish writers. The German professor Sabine Koller also contributes an essay dedicated to Der Nister’s book, which records his impressions of Leningrad, Moscow, and Kharkov during the 1920s. It’s a real delight to see so much attention is devoted to this book, which has been relatively unappreciated in previous considerations of Der Nister.’ — Marc Caplan, Forward 2 August 2017
  • ‘In “Moscow Threefold: Olgin, Bergelson, Benjamin,” Murav elegantly analyzes depictions of Moscow in the mid-1920s by three writers. Emphasizing Moscow as a Jewish “space of contiguity,” Murav addresses no less the relating of Moscow to time... If Olgin’s Moscow “has achieved . . . its future,” the works of Benjamin and Bergelson show more ambivalence, and Murav is especially vivid on Bergelson’s vision of destruction likely to precede any possible redemption, which may end up permanently deferred.’ — Jeffrey A. Grossman, Slavic Review Spring 2019, 293-95

Contents:

i-vi
Three Cities of Yiddish: Three Cities of Yiddish
Gennady Estraikh, Mikhail Krutikov
Cite
vii-viii
Table of Contents
Gennady Estraikh, Mikhail Krutikov
Cite
ix-x
Acknowledgements
G.E., M.K.
Cite
1-4
Introduction: Revisiting Three Cities
Gennady Estraikh, Mikhail Krutikov
Cite
5-21
Chapter 1 Jewish Geography in Three Cities: St Petersburg, Moscow, and Warsaw in 1897
Jeffrey Veidlinger
Cite
22-32
Chapter 2 Missionaries of the Jewish Nation: Meeting Points Between Russian and Polish Jewry Before the First World War
Joanna Nalewajko-Kulikov
Cite
33-44
Chapter 3 What the Readers Think: Two Reader Surveys in the Literarishe Bleter
Sima Beeri
Cite
45-55
Chapter 4 Moscow Threefold: Olgin, Bergelson, Benjamin
Harriet Murav
Cite
56-72
Chapter 5 Sholem Asch’s Moscow Sojourn, 1928
Gennady Estraikh
Cite
73-89
Chapter 6 Der Nister’s ‘Leningrad’: A Phantom Fartseykhenung
Sabine Koller
Cite
90-103
Chapter 7 From Facts To Symbols: Space and Architecture in Der Nister’s Hoyptshtet
Mikhail Krutikov
Cite
104-123
Chapter 8 Did Mikhail Epelbaum Study at Warsaw Conservatoire?: the Early Years of An Eminent Yiddish Singer
Alexander Frenkel
Cite
124-140
Chapter 9 Warsaw, St Petersburg, and Moscow in the Life of the Yiddish Actress Clara Young
Galina Eliasberg
Cite
141-157
Chapter 10 Yiddish Music and Musicology in Petrograd/leningrad/st Petersburg Through the Prism of the City Archives
Alexander Ivanov
Cite
158-193
Chapter 11 Between Ethnography of Religion and Anti-Religious Propaganda: Jewish Graphics in the Leningrad and Moscow Museums in 1930s
Alla Sokolova
Cite
194-202
Index
Gennady Estraikh, Mikhail Krutikov
Cite

Bibliography entry:

Estraikh, Gennady, and Mikhail Krutikov (eds), Three Cities of Yiddish: St Petersburg, Warsaw and Moscow, Studies In Yiddish, 15 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2017)

First footnote reference: 35 Three Cities of Yiddish: St Petersburg, Warsaw and Moscow, ed. by Gennady Estraikh and Mikhail Krutikov, Studies In Yiddish, 15 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2017), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Estraikh and Krutikov, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Estraikh, Gennady, and Mikhail Krutikov (eds). 2017. Three Cities of Yiddish: St Petersburg, Warsaw and Moscow, Studies In Yiddish, 15 (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Estraikh and Krutikov 2017: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Estraikh and Krutikov 2017: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


This title is distributed on behalf of MHRA by Ingram’s. Booksellers and libraries can order direct from Ingram by setting up a free ipage® Account: click here for more.


Permanent link to this title: