Thinking with Shakespeare
Comparative and Interdisciplinary Essays

Edited by William Poole and Richard Scholar

Legenda (General Series)

Legenda

23 February 2007  •  154pp

ISBN: 978-1-904350-84-2 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

RenaissanceEnglishPhilosophyDrama


Shakespeare's works do not embody any doctrine or set of beliefs, as his critics have long been tempted to suggest, but they do stage encounters with certain kinds of thinking — ethical, political, epistemological, even metaphysical — that still concern us nowadays. They can be shown to draw on ancient philosophies — Platonism, Stoicism, Scepticism — either directly or through medieval and continental Renaissance thought. Or their scenarios can be likened to those of other kinds of intellectual argument, such as legal or theological discourse. The essays collected in this volume, which is dedicated to A. D. Nuttall, demonstrate the value of 'thinking with' Shakespeare, either as embodied in Shakespeare's own creative programme or in our use of philosophical paradigms as an approach to his works.

William Poole is Fellow and Tutor in English, New College, Oxford. Richard Scholar is Fellow and Tutor in French, Oriel College, Oxford.

Reviews:

  • ‘In his witty, deeply learned and humane "Last Word", Nuttall reminds us that the famous principle of economy in explanation, Ockham's Razor, when applied to Shakespeare's plays, should be renamed "Ockham's Beard", which prompts us to ask of any of Shakespeare's plays, "What else is going on?"... What makes this collection distinctive is that nearly all of these essays focus centrally on genre.’ — Paul Cefalu, Shakespeare Quarterly 59.3, Fall 2008, 345-48
  • ‘Frank Kermode once referred to Nuttall (who died in 2007) as "probably the most philosophically-minded of modern literary critics", and the volume reflects this emphasis... A stimulating collection of pieces, of relevance not just to Shakespeareans but also to anyone with an interest in questions of the nature of literary value.’ — unsigned, Forum for Modern Language Studies 46.1, January 2010, 118-19

Contents:

1-8
Introduction
William Poole, Richard Scholar
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9-22
Why Shakespeare is not Michelangelo
Colin Burrow
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23-32
The Opinion of Pythagoras
Gabriel Josipovici
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33-52
Shakespeare Philosophus
Charles Martindale
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53-72
False Trials and the Impulse to Try in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries
Subha Mukherji
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73-92
Two Concepts of Reality in Antony and Cleopatra
N. K. Sugimura
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93-114
Dreaming, Looking, and Seeing: Shakespeare and a Myth of Resurrection
Stephen Medcalf
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115-120
When Shakespeare Met Montaigne
Terence Cave
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121-128
The Last Word
A. D. Nuttall
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Bibliography entry:

Poole, William, and Richard Scholar (eds), Thinking with Shakespeare: Comparative and Interdisciplinary Essays (Cambridge: Legenda, 2007)

First footnote reference: 35 Thinking with Shakespeare: Comparative and Interdisciplinary Essays, ed. by William Poole and Richard Scholar (Cambridge: Legenda, 2007), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Poole and Scholar, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Poole, William, and Richard Scholar (eds). 2007. Thinking with Shakespeare: Comparative and Interdisciplinary Essays (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Poole and Scholar 2007: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Poole and Scholar 2007: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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