Robert Garnier in Elizabethan England: Mary Sidney Herbert’s Antonius and Thomas Kyd’s Cornelia
Edited by Marie-Alice Belle and Line Cottegnies
Tudor and Stuart Translations 1611 September 2017

  • ‘By editing the plays as translations, the edition’s attention to intertextuality and early modern commonplacing renews our sense of these plays’ significance in their own right, as well as in relation to the Sidney Circle, to contemporary women’s writing, and to fully theatrical dramas like Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra and Kyd’s Spanish Tragedy.’ — Peter Auger, Translation and Literature 27, 2019, 353-60 (full text online)
  • ‘Altogether, this volume is an excellent critical edition: solidly researched, sensibly organized, and practical to use. It contains a comprehensive bibliography of the most up-to-date research in both French and English and draws upon this foundation abundantly in its critical commentary. It thereby provides readers with all the background necessary to understand and appreciate the plays, highlights the wide array of questions and studies they have already inspired, and provides an excellent starting point for anyone wishing to explore them in greater depth.’ — Luke Arnason, Renaissance and Reformation 41.4, Autumn 2018, 206-208

Arthur Golding’s A Moral Fabletalk and Other Renaissance Fable Translations
Edited by Liza Blake and Kathryn Vomero Santos
Tudor and Stuart Translations 123 January 2017

  • ‘An excellent overview of fable and its literary and educational significance for nearly two centuries, from William Caxton’s edition of 1484 to John Ogilby’s fables, last printed in 1675... this is an important book that every library should have, not only for the texts that it presents but also because it shows the remarkable range of cultural work done by fable during the long Renaissance.’ — Edward Wheatley, Renaissance Quarterly 2018, 70.4, 1652-54
  • ‘Overall, this collection is a significant contribution to the study of English Renaissance translations, an exceptional tool to understand the function of Aesopian fables in the early modern period, and an accessible new source for scholars interested in Golding's work. It would also work well in upper-level undergraduate courses, providing students with a fascinating and illuminating view of the world of Aesopian fables' translation. This magnificent volume will be an excellent addition for any library.’ — Florinda Ruiz, Sixteenth Century Journal XLVIII:3, 2017, 813-15
  • ‘Exhibits the same virtues as Kendal’s edition [of Chapman's Homer, TST 21]. The editors’ inclusion of a variety of Aesopian fables from the late fifteenth through the mid-seventeenth century, together with good reproductions of contemporary engravings and woodcuts, beautifully demonstrates the malleability of the genre.’ — Lowell Gallagher, Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 58.1, Winter 2018, 219-77
  • ‘The collection’s extensive black-and-white woodcut and engraving reproductions, which appear on almost every other page, contribute substantially to its aesthetic appeal, while its large format and sturdy construction make it well worth the reasonable purchase price. Overall, this literally fabulous collection will make a welcome addition and substantial contribution to any scholarly library.’ — Mark Albert Johnston, Renaissance and Reformation 41.1, Winter 2018, 173-75
  • ‘The individual fables are supplemented by an index, a glossary of lesser-known terms, a comprehensive bibliography, and summaries of the publication history of each text, all of which help make the volume invaluable as a reference work.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 54.1, 2018, 115
  • ‘The fables are all illustrated with beautifully clear images taken from old texts. There is a concise and useful introduction covering literary- theoretical and -historical aspects of the fable as a kind of writing, and also the editorial principles used in preparing the texts... The new MHRA edition is justified on the grounds of its greater availability (it costs £35), and also because it contains a lot more material in the form of the fables by other authors. The range of authors and texts offered by the new edition is surely what will make it so valuable (and cheap) an edition to any university library.’ — Mike Pincombe, Spenser Review 48.2.14, Spring-Summer 2018
  • ‘This recent volume from the MHRA’s series Tudor & Stuart Translations offers a fascinating insight into the production, circulation, and consumption of the genre of the fable, often neglected in early modern scholarship. The editors perform a valuable service in recognizing that much research still remains to be executed in this area of English Studies, an area which is all too often overshadowed by better- established traditions of theorization and criticism in other European languages.’ — Andrew Hiscock, Modern Language Review 114.1, January 2019, 113-15 (full text online)

Margaret Tyler, Mirror of Princely Deeds and Knighthood
Edited by Joyce Boro
Tudor and Stuart Translations 111 July 2014

  • ‘Boro’s judicious use of textual notes, the glossary, and her explanatory introduction, make this edition accessible to a wide audience and suitable for introducing new readers to Early Modern chivalric romance.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 51, 2015, 237
  • ‘[This] very complete edition, with a useful introduction, is particularly welcome given the recent critical interest in Tyler's prologue to her Mirror.’ — Barbara Fuchs, Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 55, 2015, 226
  • ‘Her discussion of the proto-feminist implications of Tyler’s translation, as well as its preface, is a model of careful and thorough linguistic analysis. Attractively priced, her edition should do much to extend the readership of The Mirror of Princely Deeds and Knighthood, and is a welcome addition to this excellent MHRA series.’ — Gillian Wright, Translation and Literature 24, 2015, 254-55
  • ‘Boro's expertly annotated edition ... a useful tool for students and scholars of early modern exchange.’ — Hannah Leah Crummé, Times Literary Supplement 23 January 2015, 26
  • ‘This edition makes a substantial contribution to Elizabethan studies.’ — H. Gaston Hall, Cahiers Élisabéthains 87, 2015
  • ‘Boro’s introduction does a fine job of summarizing the previous fifteen years of intense scholarly interest on Tyler’s work, and clearly articulates avenues for further investigation and inquiry.’ — Aaron Taylor Miedema, Renaissance and Reformation 39.3, Summer 2016, 217-18

Ovid in English, 1480-1625: Part One: Metamorphoses
Edited by Sarah Annes Brown and Andrew Taylor
Tudor and Stuart Translations 4/1 of 21 October 2013

  • ‘This volume is particularly useful for those interested in translation and adaptation culture in early modern England and could be especially valuable for scholars working on the specific myths highlighted.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50, 2014, 503
  • ‘This is a beautifully presented edition of a selection of early modern translations of Ovid’s Metamorphoses, which manages to be both student-friendly and a provocative resource to stimulate further research.’ — Tamsin Badcoe, Modern Language Review 110, 2015, 1110-11 (full text online)
  • ‘The comprehensibility, and thus accessibility, of each item is incomparably enhanced by the editors’ modernization of texts, by their full annotation (both in the form of marginal glosses and extensive on-the-page commentary), and by their lengthy and learned Introduction which sets each piece in context and points out its potential interest for students of both English and classical literature.’ — David Hopkins, Translation and Literature 23, 2014, 402-04
  • ‘Brown and Taylor provide a real service to the student not only of the reception of the Metamorphoses in the English Renaissance but also of the pervasive Ovidianism in Tudor and Stuart literary culture. This attractively produced volume should spur new interest in the Ovidian vogue in early modern England.’ — Alison Keith, Renaissance and Reformation 39, 2016, 214-17

Thomas May, Lucan's Pharsalia (1627)
Edited by Emma Buckley and Edward Paleit 
Tudor and Stuart Translations 187 December 2020

Thomas Elyot, The Image of Governance and Other Dialogues of Counsel (1533–1541)
Edited by David Carlson
Tudor and Stuart Translations 2412 November 2018

  • ‘This edition will be highly useful to scholars and ought to find its way onto a number of university reading lists.’ — J. S. Crown, Sixteenth Century Journal 50, 2019, 1271

An Apology or Answer in Defence of The Church Of England: Lady Anne Bacon's Translation of Bishop John Jewel's Apologia Ecclesiae Anglicanae
Edited by Patricia Demers
Tudor and Stuart Translations 221 January 2016

  • ‘Lady Anne Bacon’s 'An Apology or Answer in Defence of the Church of England', edited by Patricia Demers for the Modern Humanities Research Association (MHRA) Tudor and Stuart Translations series, has a comprehensive and wonderfully clear introduction describing Bacon’s provocative and blunt style, her commitment to humanist rather than technical translation principles, and her motives for taking on a translation of John Jewel’s flash point 'Apologia Ecclesiae Anglicanae' in the first place.’ — Katherine Eggert, English Literature 57, 2017, 208
  • ‘Patricia Demers’s new edition is an important addition to the MHRA series Tudor and Stuart Translations. In line with the ambitions of the series, the edition makes Anne’s translation more accessible to modern readers, both through its substantial introduction and through the comprehensive footnotes on the text itself... This edition will be welcomed not only by scholars of early modern female translation, but also by those interested in the place held by the Apology in Elizabethan religious debate.’ — Gemma Allen, Renaissance Quarterly 70.1, Spring 2017, 361-62
  • ‘This is an excellent volume and should become the new standard edition of the English translation of the Apologia. The work is available in an affordable paperback edition, making it ideal for classroom use.’ — Greg Peters, Sixteenth Century Journal 48.1, 2017, 242-43
  • ‘Patricia Demers’s beautifully- and painstakingly-edited volume makes an excellent addition to the series... Demers has produced a very fine and full edition of the Bacon/Jewel Apology or Answer in Defence of the Church of England that should be invaluable to scholars and graduate students working in early modern women’s writing, Elizabethan history, and the history and theology of the English Reformation.’ — Patricia Brace, Renaissance and Reformation 40.2, Spring 2017, 169-171
  • ‘This edition is an invaluable resource for both students and scholars for many reasons, such as its structure and features, the excellent background information in the introduction, and the clarity of Demers’s writing... This volume will prove very useful to scholars of the Elizabethan Church, and its glossary and footnotes also make it accessible for students. Considering the centrality of its argument to early Elizabethan religious debate, this new edition is an invaluable addition to modern translations of early modern primary sources.’ — Angela Ranson, Spenser Review 48.2.11, Spring-Summer 2018

James Mabbe, The Spanish Bawd
Edited by José María Pérez Fernández
Tudor and Stuart Translations 101 October 2013

  • ‘This edited volume is a valuable contribution to early modern translation studies; it opens this neglected tragicomedy to new audiences, offers an erudite consideration of Mabbe’s text and its place within a complex web of literary and cultural exchange, and lays a solid foundation for future scholarship on La Celestina and The Spanish Bawd.’ — Edel Semple, Renaissance Quarterly 68, 2015, 1488-89
  • ‘Required reading for anyone with an interest in Mabbe and early Stuart Hispanism ... Pérez’s edition of The Spanish Bawd is the authoritative edition, the one I think scholars of the period will most want to have on their bookshelves.’ — John R. Yamamoto-Wilson, Translation and Literature 24, 2015, 99-103
  • ‘This MHRA edition, modernized for accessibility, offers an excellent point of entry to both early modern Spanish literature and renaissance translation.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 51, 2015, 231

William Barker, Xenophon's 'Cyropædia'
Edited by Jane Grogan
Tudor and Stuart Translations 1320 March 2020

Gavin Douglas, The Aeneid (1513): Part One: Introduction, Books I-VIII
Edited by Gordon Kendal
Tudor and Stuart Translations 7/1 of 21 September 2011

  • ‘This edition is most welcome. No lover of Douglas or of Virgil has any excuse for not buying it.’ — Alastair Fowler, Times Literary Supplement 27 April 2012, 5
  • ‘Kendal’s edition accomplishes what the series sets out to do: here is a version of Douglas’ translation that will allow a non-specialist audience to read it more fluently and enjoy it. A broader audience and a teaching function might also be promoted by the text’s digital availability. As Douglas wished his translation to ‘be repute a needful work’ for Virgil, so this edition should become for those who would present Douglas’ translation effectively to a broader modern audience.’ — Sheldon Brammall, Translation and Literature 21, 2012, 241

Gavin Douglas, The Aeneid (1513): Part Two: Books IX – XIII, Appendices, Glossary, Index
Edited by Gordon Kendal
Tudor and Stuart Translations 7/2 of 21 September 2011

  • ‘This edition is most welcome. No lover of Douglas or of Virgil has any excuse for not buying it.’ — Alastair Fowler, Times Literary Supplement 27 April 2012, 5
  • ‘Kendal’s edition accomplishes what the series sets out to do: here is a version of Douglas’ translation that will allow a non-specialist audience to read it more fluently and enjoy it. A broader audience and a teaching function might also be promoted by the text’s digital availability. As Douglas wished his translation to ‘be repute a needful work’ for Virgil, so this edition should become for those who would present Douglas’ translation effectively to a broader modern audience.’ — Sheldon Brammall, Translation and Literature 21, 2012, 241

George Chapman: Homer's Odyssey
Edited by Gordon Kendal
Tudor and Stuart Translations 2116 September 2016

  • ‘Kendal states that Chapman sought “to bring Homer’s translucence within the reader’s grasp” (29) and this edition (recently joined by an edition of Chapman’s Iliad, ed. Robert Miola) does something similar for Chapman’s work, endowing a multifaceted, challenging, and important early modern poem with a new level of accessibility.’ — Katherine Heavey, Renaissance Quarterly 71.1, 2018, 224-25
  • ‘George Chapman’s Homer’s Odyssey, edited by Gordon Kendal, performs an inestimable service by giving students and scholars an easily readable text of Chapman’s landmark 1616 translation of the Odyssey, with modernized spelling and punctuation and a helpful marginal glossary as well as a very fine introductory essay that places Chapman’s achievement in its literary and cultural context.’ — Lowell Gallagher, Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 58.1, Winter 2018, 219-77
  • ‘The MHRA edition vastly improves our ability to appreciate Chapman’s Homer as English poetry. The new edition presents a far more accessible text of Chapman’s Homer than any previous edition... The new MHRA editions undoubtedly surpass previous editions for classroom use. They make it practical, perhaps for the first time, to incorporate Chapman into courses on Jacobean poetry, on classical reception and the history of translation, on the materiality of the early modern book.’ — Sarah Van der Laan, Spenser Review 48.2.15, Spring-Summer 2018
  • ‘A clear, inexpensive critical edition of Chapman's Odyssey is a welcome addition to the Modern Humanities Research Association's series, as it puts into print a work of significant influence on and reflective of early modern literature and culture... The text itself is extensively footnoted and well glossed, giving the novice reader of early modern English a solid guide to the more difficult elements of vocabulary and allusion without interfering unduly with a smooth reading of the poem.’ — Natalie Grinnell, Sixteenth Century Journal 49.3, 2018, 884-85
  • ‘We should certainly be grateful for Kendal’s careful, learned, and illuminating scholarship, which guides us through the twists and turns of the translated text to a fuller understanding and enjoyment of Chapman’s English Odyssey.’ — Marie-Alice Belle, Renaissance and Reformation 41.2, Spring 2018, 164-66
  • ‘For the significantly improved access to Chapman’s Homer and for the rich collection of pointers in the footnotes, both of these volumes are worthy additions to the MHRA series. Miola and Kendal also allow their affection for Chapman to energize their editions, which provides the reader with some extra motivation to tackle these challenging texts.’ — Sheldon Brammall, Translation and Literature 27, 2018, 223–31
  • ‘This recent addition to the MHRA’s ‘Tudor & Stuart Translations’ series is quite simply a joy to read... one of the great achievements of this volume is that it accomplishes the difficult task of both guiding the novice (perhaps student) reader through Chapman’s complex undertaking and offering researchers an excellent platform on which to conduct their own studies... Catering so broadly to the needs of a diverse readership, the volume is much to be commended.’ — Andrew Hiscock, Modern Language Review 113.4, October 2018, 855-56 (full text online)

English Renaissance Translation Theory
Edited by Neil Rhodes with Gordon Kendal and Louise Wilson
Tudor and Stuart Translations 91 August 2013

  • ‘Not only is the anthology representative, but it is rich in the diversity of opinions expressed ... Needless to say, this is a must acquisition for those interested in those redoubtable early English translators as artisans and cultural mediators reflecting, after the fact, upon how the instruments of translation do what they do, and according to whose bidding.’ — Donald Beecher, Renaissance and Reformation 37.2, 2014, 187-90
  • ‘The general editors' ambitions ... are brilliantly realized ... This is an invaluable work that will shape future directions in early modern translation studies.’ — Liz Oakley-Brown, Renaissance Quarterly 68, 2015, 383-84
  • ‘Supremely useful ... this volume will be a major spur to translation studies.’ — Barbara Fuchs, Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 55, 2015, 225
  • ‘English Renaissance Translation Theory is an important work – a necessary one, indeed [...] from now on, nobody working on translation in the Tudor and early Stuart periods will wish to be without it.’ — Massimiliano Morini, Translation and Literature 23, 2014, 390-93
  • ‘A substantial and illuminating introduction opens up debates familiar to scholars and translators today, such as whether to privilege word over sense, or to prefer poesy or prose in translation, and situates them firmly in their renaissance context.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50, 2014, 505
  • ‘This is an important book that will prove an invaluable resource to undergraduates new to translation theory and to the more informed reader alike.’ — Rachel Willie, Modern Language Review 111, 2016, 538 (full text online)
  • ‘The most comprehensive anthology of English Renaissance Translation Theory that has ever been printed, and it will be a trusted companion text for generations of future scholars.’ — Joshua Reid, Spenser Review 45.2.34, Fall 2015

Elizabethan Seneca: Three Tragedies
Edited by James Ker and Jessica Winston
Tudor and Stuart Translations 81 October 2012

  • ‘This important edition will act as a stimulus for further comparative work: it will help to reconfigure our valuation of Elizabethan Seneca not just in terms of its legacy (important though that is) but as an innovative literary endeavour in its own right.’ — Sarah Dewar-Watson, Times Literary Supplement 5 April 2013, 27
  • ‘It is appropriate and welcome that one of the first volumes in the attractive new MHRA series gives [the translations] the stage to themselves for a while, and an occasion even for those who already more or less know them to look at them afresh.’ — Gordon Braden, Translation and Literature 22, 2013, 274
  • ‘Seneca is enjoying a renaissance of sorts, prompting reevaluations of both his plays and their afterlives. This intelligently conceived and carefully edited volume offers a valuable opportunity to examine the evidence firsthand ... This volume is clear, intelligent, and informed by current scholarship; it will be valuable for scholars with an interest in Seneca, Elizabethan translation, classical reception, academic drama, and/or the development of tragedy.’ — Tanya Pollard, Renaissance Quarterly 66, 2013, 1513-14
  • ‘This edition will be tremendously useful not just to scholars working on classical transmission or early modern drama, but also to those looking at Elizabethan literary culture as a whole. Ker and Winston successfully demonstrate the centrality of Seneca to the Elizabethan literary landscape and open doors for a wide variety of potential areas of enquiry.’ — Kavita Mudan Finn, Sixteenth Century Journal 45, 2014, 474-75
  • ‘An excellent entry-point for students to the contexts both of the Senecan originals and of the Tudor translations.’ — Andrew J. Power, Modern Language Review 110, 2015, 238-39 (full text online)

George Chapman: Homer's Iliad
Edited by Robert S. Miola
Tudor and Stuart Translations 2011 September 2017

  • ‘The MHRA edition vastly improves our ability to appreciate Chapman’s Homer as English poetry. The new edition presents a far more accessible text of Chapman’s Homer than any previous edition... The new MHRA editions undoubtedly surpass previous editions for classroom use. They make it practical, perhaps for the first time, to incorporate Chapman into courses on Jacobean poetry, on classical reception and the history of translation, on the materiality of the early modern book.’ — Sarah Van der Laan, Spenser Review 48.2.15, Spring-Summer 2018
  • ‘For the significantly improved access to Chapman’s Homer and for the rich collection of pointers in the footnotes, both of these volumes are worthy additions to the MHRA series. Miola and Kendal also allow their affection for Chapman to energize their editions, which provides the reader with some extra motivation to tackle these challenging texts.’ — Sheldon Brammall, Translation and Literature 27, 2018, 223–31
  • ‘This expertly edited volume, suitable for scholars, students, and general readers alike, significantly expands what we know about the cultural transmission of classical texts in early modern Europe. Presenting new insights regarding the reception and dissemination of Homeric epic in early modern England, it also helpfully illuminates Chapman’s specific contributions as versifier, wordsmith, and critic.’ — Melinda J. Gough, Renaissance and Reformation 42.4, Autumn 2019, 208-10
  • ‘Miola’s edition at last makes available the riches of this enormously influential translation for early modern Britain in a highly accessible and affordable publication. It constitutes an invaluable companion to the earlier publication in the series of Chapman’s Odyssey.’ — Andrew Hiscock, Modern Language Review 115.2, 2020, 445-47 (full text online)

Petrarch's Triumphi in English
Edited by Alessandra Petrina 
Tudor and Stuart Translations 2720 August 2020

Plutarch in English, 1528–1603: Volume 1: Essays
Edited by Fred Schurink 
Tudor and Stuart Translations 2/1 of 218 December 2020

Plutarch in English, 1528–1603: Volume 2: Lives
Edited by Fred Schurink 
Tudor and Stuart Translations 2/2 of 218 December 2020

Humphrey Llwyd, The Breviary of Britain with selections from The History of Cambria
Edited by Philip Schwyzer
Tudor and Stuart Translations 51 September 2011

  • ‘These are complex texts, the further study of which will be facilitated, and should be encouraged, by this edition.’ — David N. Parsons, Translation and Literature 21, 2012, 246
  • ‘This modern edition of Humphrey Llwyd is a welcome addition to the scholarship ... Schwyzer's work presents a compelling case for a greater recognition of Llwyd's contributions.’ — Ronald H. Fritze, Sixteenth Century Journal XLIV, 2013, 200

Richard Carew, The Examination of Men's Wits
Edited by Rocío G. Sumillera
Tudor and Stuart Translations 171 August 2014

  • ‘This MHRA edition, modernized for accessibility, offers an excellent point of entry to both early modern Spanish literature and renaissance translation.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 51, 2015, 231
  • ‘Sumillera’s edition is an important contribution to sixteenth-century studies.’ — Andrew Breeze, Modern Language Review 112.1, January 2017, 223-24 (full text online)
  • ‘Rocio G. Sumillera has produced an erudite yet accessible edition of Richard Carew's The Examination of Men's Wits (London, 1594), the first English translation of Juan Huarte de San Juan's El examen de ingenios para las ciencias (Baeza, 1575), a vital and influential, yet too often overlooked, humanist treatise... It is much to the credit of the Modern Humanities Research Association's Tudor and Stuart Translations series that they have made this vernacular English edition available and that they have done so in both hardback and the less expensive paperback.’ — Maura Giles-Watson and Yasmine Hachimi, Sixteenth Century Journal 48.1, 2017, 241-42