In Defence of Women
Translated by Joanna M. Barker
New Translations 1413 August 2018

  • ‘With this edition, Barker provides a detailed account of an intellectual debate in eighteenth-century Spain that holds great relevance for contemporary scholarship in women's studies, European history and literary studies, among other fields.’ — Leslie J. Harkema, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 96, 2019, 1715-16

St Teresa of Ávila: Her Writings and Life
Edited by Terence O'Reilly, Colin Thompson and Lesley Twomey
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 1910 September 2018

  • ‘The variety of topics and approaches in these essays, and the erudition and rigour of their authors, ensures that this volume represents an invaluable contribution to scholarship on St Teresa of Avila and will serve as a touchstone for future work on this saint and, more generally, on religious writing in the period.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 55.4, October 2019, 498-99 (full text online)
  • ‘Readers from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds will find this collection fruitful and accessible, and scholars who are unfamiliar with Spanish will find faithful translations... The volume commemorates the five-hundredth anniversary of Teresa’s birth, but its imaginative, far-reaching perspectives on her life and legacy show that there is still ample appetite and space for future Teresian scholarship.’ — Catherine Maguire, Hispanic Research Journal 20.4, 2019, 409-10 (full text online)
  • ‘The contributors [...] deepen our understanding of Teresa by noting previously-overlooked sources and influences and emphasizing her theological contributions, which carry potential relevance in spiritual discussions today. As Thompson notes, in Teresa’s writings we encounter her not as an otherworldly being, but a person to whom modern-day readers can relate. The essays in this volume allow us further access to the human experiences, resultant insights and immediate legacy of one of Spain’s most famous saints.’ — Teresa Hancock-Parmer, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 97.2, 2020, 269-70

The Modern Spanish Canon: Visibility, Cultural Capital and the Academy
Edited by Stuart Davis and Maite Usoz de la Fuente
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 2822 August 2018

  • ‘This volume showcases the work of early-career scholars working in modern peninsular Spanish studies as they seek a breakthrough into the institutional realm of the contemporary academy. It comprises ten essays ordered and presented by the editors, who, in a spirited Introduction, identify fundamental questions and issues ranging from nomenclature (Spanish Studies? Iberian Studies?) and the politics of the discipline, to ownership and the constitution of the canon.’ — Robin Fiddian, Hispanic Research Journal 20.4, 2019, 416-17 (full text online)
  • ‘A welcome and handsome contribution to debates on the limits, possibilities and opportunities for current and future research on the modern Spanish cultural canon... An excellent vision of the vibrant health of early-career Hispanism and a thought-provoking challenge to established critical paradigms... this volume is testament to a very bright and innovative future for our discipline.’ — Alison Ribeiro de Menezes, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 96.9, 2019, 1557-58

Gómez Manrique, Statesman and Poet: The Practice of Poetry in Fifteenth-Century Spain
Gisèle Earle
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 3126 February 2018

  • ‘In this comprehensive study of how Manrique practised poetry, which also includes his prose, Earle offers both detailed textual analysis of individual works and an interpretation of Manrique’s literary corpus. Through this dual focus, Earle emphasizes the evolution of Manrique’s rhetorical style through figurative language and the political thrust of Manrique’s writing, including works that have traditionally been studied separately, such as elegy and devotional texts. As a result, this study makes a valuable contribution to existing scholarship through its new perspective on Manrique’s textual production, which also opens doors for future investigation.’ — Holly Sims, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 96.8, 2019, 1343-65 (full text online)