Spanish New York Narratives 1898-1936
Modernization, Otherness and Nation

David Miranda-Barreiro

Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 5

Legenda

1 November 2014  •  198pp

ISBN: 978-1-909662-15-5 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ISBN: 978-1-315087-77-1 (Taylor & Francis ebook)

ModernSpanishFiction


In the early decades of the twentieth century, New York caught the attention of Spanish writers. Many of them visited the city and returned to tell their experience in the form of a literary text, such as Pruebas de Nueva York (1927) by José Moreno Villa (1887-1955), El crisol de las razas (1929) by Teresa de Escoriaza (1891-1968), Anticípolis (1931) by Luis de Oteyza (1883-1961) and La ciudad automática (1932) by Julio Camba (1882-1962).

In tune with similar representations in other European works, the image of New York given in these texts reflects the tensions and anxieties generated by the modernisation embodied by the United States. These authors project onto New York their concerns and expectations about issues of class, gender and ethnicity that were debated at the time, in the context of the crisis of Spanish national identity triggered by the end of the empire in 1898.

David Miranda-Barreiro is Lecturer in Hispanic Studies at Bangor University (Wales).

Reviews:

  • ‘A well-organized and clearly argued study that situates Spain’s view on modernity within the European context. It will be of interest to scholars on early twentieth-century Spain, Modernism, transnationalism and popular narratives.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 51.4, October 2015, 502-03
  • ‘What could have been a niche study derives its strength and originality from offering new insights into debates on Spanish modernity. This is illustrated well by the primary materials chosen, since they do not necessarily have great literary merit in their own right but serve as the testament to a certain Zeitgeist. Students of Lorca’s Poeta en Nueva York would, for example, benefit from the context on race and multiculturalism provided by the book.’ — Daniela Omlor, Modern Language Review 112.3, July 2017, 728-29 (full text online)
  • ‘El estudio de Miranda-Barreiro, que explora la imagen de Nueva York como símbolo de la modernidad, es de gran actualidad... hay que felicitar a Miranda-Barreiro por incluir géneros poco estudiados hasta ahora en la prosa de los años veinte, así como por el carácter comparatista que adopta. Aunque su aportación más importante es, en mi opinión, su capítulo sobre la raza, la nación y la modernidad, el libro es también de gran interés para el especialista que quiera profundizar en el tratamiento de Nueva York en la narrativa de esta época.’ — María Soledad Fernández Utrera, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 94, 2017, 902-04
  • ‘A well-written book that stands as a major contribution to the field.’ — Anna Vives, The Year's Work in Modern Language Studies 78, 2018, 190-91

Bibliography entry:

Miranda-Barreiro, David, Spanish New York Narratives 1898-1936: Modernization, Otherness and Nation, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 5 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2014)

First footnote reference: 35 David Miranda-Barreiro, Spanish New York Narratives 1898-1936: Modernization, Otherness and Nation, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 5 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2014), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Miranda-Barreiro, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Miranda-Barreiro, David. 2014. Spanish New York Narratives 1898-1936: Modernization, Otherness and Nation, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 5 (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Miranda-Barreiro 2014: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Miranda-Barreiro 2014: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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