Unamuno’s Theory of the Novel
C. A. Longhurst
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 11 July 2014

  • ‘A highly illuminating exploration regarding Unamuno’s views on narrative fiction that pays attention to the pervasiveness of elements referring to the physical and mental worlds, the author, the word, the reader, the person, the double and philosophical investigations.’ — Anna Vives, The Year's Work in Modern Language Studies 78, 2018, 193-94

Pessoa's Geometry of the Abyss: Modernity and the Book of Disquiet
Paulo de Medeiros
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 24 December 2013

  • ‘This dense book, full of creative suggestions and a thorough knowledge of the modern background, places Pessoa and the Book of Disquiet center stage in its probing and questioning of the meaning of modernity in one of its most complex and compelling avatars.’ — K. David Jackson, Luso-Brazilian Review 52.2, 2015, 196-98

Artifice and Invention in the Spanish Golden Age
Edited by Stephen Boyd and Terence O'Reilly
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 31 November 2014

The Latin American Short Story at its Limits: Fragmentation, Hybridity and Intermediality
Lucy Bell
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 41 November 2014

  • ‘This study adds to the scholarly criticism of these three authors [Rulfo, Cortázar, Monterroso] and suggests a potentially productive approach that extends beyond Latin American studies into the field of Comparative Literature.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 52.1, 2016, 113-14

Spanish New York Narratives 1898-1936: Modernization, Otherness and Nation
David Miranda-Barreiro
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 51 November 2014

  • ‘A well-organized and clearly argued study that situates Spain’s view on modernity within the European context. It will be of interest to scholars on early twentieth-century Spain, Modernism, transnationalism and popular narratives.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 51.4, October 2015, 502-03
  • ‘What could have been a niche study derives its strength and originality from offering new insights into debates on Spanish modernity. This is illustrated well by the primary materials chosen, since they do not necessarily have great literary merit in their own right but serve as the testament to a certain Zeitgeist. Students of Lorca’s Poeta en Nueva York would, for example, benefit from the context on race and multiculturalism provided by the book.’ — Daniela Omlor, Modern Language Review 112.3, July 2017, 728-29 (full text online)
  • ‘El estudio de Miranda-Barreiro, que explora la imagen de Nueva York como símbolo de la modernidad, es de gran actualidad... hay que felicitar a Miranda-Barreiro por incluir géneros poco estudiados hasta ahora en la prosa de los años veinte, así como por el carácter comparatista que adopta. Aunque su aportación más importante es, en mi opinión, su capítulo sobre la raza, la nación y la modernidad, el libro es también de gran interés para el especialista que quiera profundizar en el tratamiento de Nueva York en la narrativa de esta época.’ — María Soledad Fernández Utrera, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 94, 2017, 902-04
  • ‘A well-written book that stands as a major contribution to the field.’ — Anna Vives, The Year's Work in Modern Language Studies 78, 2018, 190-91

The Art of Ana Clavel: Ghosts, Urinals, Dolls, Shadows and Outlaw Desires
Jane Elizabeth Lavery
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 616 March 2015

  • ‘El libro de Lavery es una obra necesaria y de actualidad para entender también el pulso de los movimientos literarios en la América de habla hispana. Es un aporte que resarce a la literatura en general y a la visibilidad de las escritoras en particular... En la narrativa de Clavel—según Lavery—, realidad, identidad y cuerpo diluyen sus fronteras dentro y fuera de la ficción, excediendo la literatura para señalar lo propio de la condición humana. Así, el trabajo de Lavery contribuye a establecer un marco teórico, o si se prefiere, el canon del acontecer de la literatura emergente no solo de México, sino de América Latina.’ — Rita Vega Baeza, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 94.10, December 2017, 1830-31

Alejo Carpentier and the Musical Text
Katia Chornik
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 711 October 2015

  • ‘Como declara la autora, este ensayo se orienta a muy variados lectores potenciales: estudiosos de la obra de Carpentier, tanto desde el punto de vista estrictamente literario como desde el ángulo de la musicología. Pero su carácter explicativo y la transparencia de su prosa lo hacen asequible también a aquellos que de manera general disfrutan la obra de nuestro novelista... Ya desde este primer capítulo se evidencia el rigor de la investigadora, la amplitud de la bibliografía y de la documentación consultada y la agudeza con la que penetra en dichos textos.’Fundación Carpentier online, 18 January 2016)
  • ‘The results of her research and scholarly publications on Carpentier, has made of her a source of consultation by other credited scholars on the subject... The author makes great contributions to Carpentier’s long list of scholarly studies... This is an excellent contribution to the vast scholarship dedicated to the works of Carpentier and his peculiar understanding of musicology, literature and musical forms.’ — Rafael E. Saumell, Bulletin of Latin American Research 36.4, October 2017, 556–557 (full text online)
  • ‘A unique contribution... useful for further scholarly research on Carpentier.’ — Alira Ashvo-Muñoz, Latin American Music Review 39.1, Spring/Summer 2018, 127-29

Books and Periodicals in Brazil 1768-1930: A Transatlantic Perspective
Edited by Ana Cláudia Suriani da Silva and Sandra Guardini Vasconcelos
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 910 December 2014

Urban Space, Identity and Postmodernity in 1980s Spain: Rethinking the Movida
Maite Usoz de la Fuente
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 1111 October 2015

  • ‘This is a great book for revisiting the years of cultural explosion in a Madrid—and a Spain—which had just emerged from nearly forty years of dictatorship. Madrid had always seemed to lag behind Barcelona as a culturally avant-garde city. La movida madrileña changed the way people looked at the capital, which had previously been seen as the home of conservatism and the political elite. Young people who had been born during the dictatorship and had never experienced real freedom in their lives embraced this new freedom... The book is well written, readable and accessible. The detailed analysis of La Luna de Madrid will prove to be a valuable resource for researchers studying the cultural output of la movida as well as others interested in the period of the Spanish Transition.’ — María José Blanco, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 95.4, May 2018, 370-71
  • ‘A substantial reflection on an epoch that continues to deserve critical attention from both scholars and members of the public.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 54.4, October 2018, 506-07 (full text online)

Santería, Vodou and Resistance in Caribbean Literature: Daughters of the Spirits
Paul Humphrey
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 1225 February 2019

  • ‘Humphrey does not argue for the homogenization of [Vodou and Santería], but for the honest recognition and acceptance of their differences. Moving past the violent stereotyping [...], he encourages us to treat these religions as ‘living systems’ in which slavery, colonialism, creolization and hybridity intersect in a dynamic negotiation of all the complexities that create what would be a ‘postcolonial’ Caribbean.’ — Janelle Rodriques, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 97.2, 2020, 294-95

Rethinking Juan Rulfo’s Creative World: Prose, Photography, Film
Edited by Dylan Brennan and Nuala Finnegan
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 141 September 2016

Catalan Narrative 1875-2015
Edited by Jordi Larios and Montserrat Lunati 
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 1628 September 2020

José Saramago: History, Utopia, and the Necessity of Error
Mark Sabine
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 2319 December 2016

  • ‘Beyond providing a rigorous, detailed and elegant analysis of those novels, Sabine offers a model for reading Saramago that will serve as reference point for any future work.’ — Paulo de Medeiros, Bulletin of Hispanic Studies 95, 2018, 579-80
  • ‘This volume is of tremendous use to both seasoned scholars of Saramago and those who, like many in the English-speaking world, are familiar only with his later novels.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 54.3, July 2018, 377
  • ‘Likely to be welcomed by specialists and non-specialists looking for a critical grounding in the author’s initial and decisive novels of the 1980s.’ — Ana Paula Ferreira, Journal of Lusophone Studies 4.2, 2019, 299-301 (full text online)
  • ‘From a broad perspective which accepts the idea of an inherent political project and its utopian message, this book excellently resumes the possible justifications, together with scholarly well founded contextualizations, thus offering an outstandingly solid basis from which to depart towards further fruitful debates.’ — Burghard Baltrusch, Portuguese Studies 36.1, July 2020, 115-19 (full text online)

Cortázar and Music
Nicholas Roberts 
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 2530 December 2019

Bodies of Disorder: Gender and Degeneration in Baroja and Blasco Ibáñez
Katharine Murphy
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 261 November 2017

  • ‘Murphy highlights the substantial points of comparison between the two authors, despite the hostility between them and their very different journeys through the literary canon. Taken in its entirety, this book deftly sets about dismantling quite a number of critical distinctions and commonplaces... This will be a valuable book for anyone working on the Spanish novel, discourses of degeneration across Europe, cultural studies, and on the dynamics of female literacy and agency.’ — Geraldine Lawless, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 96.9, 2019, 1553-55

The Art of Cervantes in Don Quixote: Critical Essays
Edited by Stephen Boyd, Trudi L. Darby and Terence O'Reilly
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 2723 September 2019

The Modern Spanish Canon: Visibility, Cultural Capital and the Academy
Edited by Stuart Davis and Maite Usoz de la Fuente
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 2822 August 2018

  • ‘This volume showcases the work of early-career scholars working in modern peninsular Spanish studies as they seek a breakthrough into the institutional realm of the contemporary academy. It comprises ten essays ordered and presented by the editors, who, in a spirited Introduction, identify fundamental questions and issues ranging from nomenclature (Spanish Studies? Iberian Studies?) and the politics of the discipline, to ownership and the constitution of the canon.’ — Robin Fiddian, Hispanic Research Journal 20.4, 2019, 416-17 (full text online)
  • ‘A welcome and handsome contribution to debates on the limits, possibilities and opportunities for current and future research on the modern Spanish cultural canon... An excellent vision of the vibrant health of early-career Hispanism and a thought-provoking challenge to established critical paradigms... this volume is testament to a very bright and innovative future for our discipline.’ — Alison Ribeiro de Menezes, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 96.9, 2019, 1557-58

The Novels of Carmen Laforet: An Aesthetics of Relief
Caragh Wells
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 2929 April 2019

  • ‘Caragh Wells's seminal exploration of the psychological and aesthetic underpinning of Laforet’s novels is a must-read for anyone interested in such aspects of literature, Hispanic and global.’ — Lilit Žekulin Thwaites, Journal of Iberian and Latin American Research March 2020 (full text online)
  • ‘A required tome for any serious scholar or student of Carmen Laforet. It is a carefully researched and thoughtfully written study that should place Caragh Wells among the elite Laforetian scholars of the day.’ — Mark P. Del Mastro, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 97.3, March 2020, 444-45

No Country for Nonconforming Women: Feminine Conceptions of Lusophone Africa
Maria Tavares
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 3230 September 2018

  • ‘An excellent scholarly contribution that is both clear and accessible. It must be critically addressed byprofessors, students, and researchers both in and beyond the Lusophone academic sphere.’ — Sandra I. Sousa, Journal of Lusophone Studies 4.1, 2019, 328-30 (full text online)

Form and Reform in Eighteenth-Century Spain: Utopian Narratives and Socio-Political Debate
Carla Almanza-Gálvez
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 3325 February 2019

Women and Nationhood in Restoration Spain 1874-1931: The State as Family
Rocío Rødtjer
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 3423 April 2019

  • ‘This is a fine and important book that will hopefully convince those critics prone to discounting the contributions of conservative women writers (Asensi and de los Ríos) to make the effort to read them, keeping in mind Rødtjer’s suggestive arguments.’ — Alda Blanco, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 97.3, March 2020, 440-41

Francisca Wood and Nineteenth-Century Periodical Culture: Pressing for Change
Cláudia Pazos Alonso 
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 3521 January 2020

Pepetela and the MPLA: The Ethical Evolution of a Revolutionary Writer
Phillip Rothwell
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 3630 April 2019

  • ‘The result is a deft, nuanced and accomplished analysis not only of Pepetela and his most important works, but of contemporary Angola and the way that the MPLA has wielded its power... It is a landmark work of scholarship from one of the field’s most accomplished critics, and essential reading for scholars of Lusophone African cultures, Angolan social history and Luso-Brazilian and African literatures.’ — Lanie Millar, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 97.6, 2020, 1069-1070

Queer Genealogies in Transnational Barcelona: Maria-Mercè Marçal, Cristina Peri Rossi, and Flavia Company
Natasha Tanna 
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 3730 December 2019

Contemporary Galician Women Writers
Catherine Barbour 
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 3928 September 2020