Rome Eternal
The City As Fatherland

Guy Lanoue

Italian Perspectives 32

Legenda

8 June 2015  •  272pp

ISBN: 978-1-909662-58-2 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ISBN: 978-1-315088-60-0 (Taylor & Francis ebook)

ItalianPhilosophyHistoryTravel


What does ‘Roman’ mean? How does the mythical city touch people’s identities, values and attitudes? In the long-established and official imaginary of the West, Rome is the città dell’arte, the city of faith, an heirloom city inspired by the traces of ancient Empire, by the brooding aura of the Church, by Hollywood fairy-tale romance, and by the spicy tang of veiled decadence. But what of its contemporary residents? Are they now merely guides and waiters servicing throngs of tourists indifferent to the city’s contemporary charms? Guy Lanoue, a former resident of Rome, explores how Romans live the modern myth of Rome Eternal. Since the 19th century, it has defined an important community, the fatherland, a home-spun society where the rules of everyday life become ‘tradition’: ways of eating, dressing, making and keeping friends and acquaintances, ‘proper’ ways of speaking and a hard to define but nonetheless tangible air of composure.

Guy Lanoue is a professor of anthropology at the Université de Montréal.

Bibliography entry:

Lanoue, Guy, Rome Eternal: The City As Fatherland, Italian Perspectives, 32 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2015)

First footnote reference: 35 Guy Lanoue, Rome Eternal: The City As Fatherland, Italian Perspectives, 32 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2015), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Lanoue, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Lanoue, Guy. 2015. Rome Eternal: The City As Fatherland, Italian Perspectives, 32 (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Lanoue 2015: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Lanoue 2015: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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