Rome
Modernity, Postmodernity and Beyond

Edited by Lesley Caldwell and Fabio Camilletti

Italian Perspectives 39

Legenda

30 September 2018  •  182pp

ISBN: 978-1-781887-17-2 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ISBN: 978-1-781887-18-9 (paperback, 7 October 2020  )  •  RRP £9.99, $12.50, €12.50

ISBN: 978-1-781887-19-6 (JSTOR ebook)

Access online: Books@JSTOR

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In addition to its original library hardback edition, this title is now on sale in the new student-priced Legenda paperback range.


What do we know of the city of Rome, beyond the repertoire of images of universally recognisable monuments? In this new volume, architects, planners, historians, literary and film theorists come together to discuss the city beyond the walls: the city where the majority of Romans live, and the extended city of the Romans themselves. Beyond its heritage status, Rome today is a metropolis facing the same challenges as any major city, yet continuingly shaped by both its imaginary and its real landscape. Particular time periods and lesser-known cultural artefacts are discussed as factors that have made Rome the city it is now, both for those who visit in such large numbers and for those who live there.

Lesley Caldwell is Honorary Professor in the Psycho­analysis Unit, and Honorary Senior Research Associate in the Department of Italian, at University College London. Fabio Camilletti is Reader in Italian at the University of Warwick.

Reviews:

  • ‘As the seat of the Roman Empire, the Catholic Church, Mussolini’s Fascism, and Silvio Berlusconi’s neoliberalism, and as a site of immigration and social diversity, Rome is characterized by complexity... A valuable contribution to the scholarship of one of Europe’s most historically significant and cathected cities and will no doubt be of value to scholars of the Eternal City within both urban and Italian studies.’ — Damien Pollard, Modern Language Review 115.1, 2020, 190-91 (full text online)

Contents:

i-vi
Rome: Rome
Lesley Caldwell, Fabio A. Camilletti
Cite
vii-viii
Table of Contents
Lesley Caldwell, Fabio A. Camilletti
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ix-x
Notes On the Contributors
Lesley Caldwell, Fabio A. Camilletti
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1-8
Chapter 1 Introduction
Lesley Caldwell
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9-18
Chapter 2 City and Porosity: Walter Benjamin’s Passages
Kevin McLaughlin
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19-36
Chapter 3 Re-Visioning Rome: the Aacar, Gustavo Giovannoni and the Invention of Urbanistica in the 1920s
Eugene Pooley
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37-52
Chapter 4 Rome in Ruins Revisited: Mario Soldati’s the Emerald and Catastrophic Futurism
Florian Mussgnug
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53-70
Chapter 5 Aesthetics of Contingency: Clark, Deleuze and Rome’s Post-War Modernism
Filippo Trentin
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71-82
Chapter 6 Rome in the 1950s: Plans, Politics and the Olympics
Giorgio Piccinato
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83-98
Chapter 7 A Very Old Neo-Liberalism: the Changing Politics and Policy of Urban Informality in the Roman Borgate
Alessandro Coppola
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99-118
Chapter 8 Regeneration and Social Inclusion Between Policy and Practices: the Case of Pigneto
Carlotta Fioretti
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119-132
Chapter 9 Redefining Italian Spaces: Piazza Vittorio and Migratory Aesthetics
Federica Mazzara
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133-152
Chapter 10 Negotiating the Present: Rome, Fabric and Memory
Lesley Caldwell
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153-164
Bibliography
Lesley Caldwell, Fabio A. Camilletti
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165-169
Index
Lesley Caldwell, Fabio A. Camilletti
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170-172
Back Matter
Lesley Caldwell, Fabio A. Camilletti
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Bibliography entry:

Caldwell, Lesley, and Fabio Camilletti (eds), Rome: Modernity, Postmodernity and Beyond, Italian Perspectives, 39 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2018)

First footnote reference: 35 Rome: Modernity, Postmodernity and Beyond, ed. by Lesley Caldwell and Fabio Camilletti, Italian Perspectives, 39 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2018), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Caldwell and Camilletti, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Caldwell, Lesley, and Fabio Camilletti (eds). 2018. Rome: Modernity, Postmodernity and Beyond, Italian Perspectives, 39 (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Caldwell and Camilletti 2018: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Caldwell and Camilletti 2018: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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