The Rhetoric of Exile
Duress and the Imagining of Force

Vladimir Zorić

Studies In Comparative Literature 39

Legenda

19 December 2016  •  196pp

ISBN: 978-1-910887-05-9 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ISBN: 978-1-781883-48-8 (paperback, 30 September 2018)  •  RRP £9.99, $12.50, €12.50

ISBN: 978-1-781883-49-5 (JSTOR ebook)

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The Rhetoric of Exile explores the rhetorical construction of force in indirect exile and in literary responses to it. Between banishment, a compulsory exile, and expatriation, a voluntary one, many legal systems have allowed for a third model. Such an exile is pragmatic and ambiguous in nature: the degree of compulsion is never explicitly defined, but all agents involved understand that it is real. As far back as the Roman Republic, there have been exiles who felt considerable duress but could not pin it down to any specific legal document or judicial decision, and these victims of silent persecution are all the more likely to brood on the elusive force over them, and to recreate it by imaginative means. What is displaced and hidden in law – force as metonymy — returns as a potent and condensed image in literature — force as metaphor.

Vladimir Zorić is Assistant Professor in Russian and Slavonic Studies at the University of Nottingham.

Reviews:

  • ‘Since the expulsion of Adam and Eve from Paradise and down to the exodus of Jews from Germany triggered by Kristallnacht, followed most recently by the flight of millions from the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America, exile has constituted a basic experience of human history and myth, summoning forth a library of commentary... Zorić has taken a rich and fascinating topic and exposed it fruitfully to various theoretical analyses.’ — Theodore Ziolkowski, Modern Language Review 113.2, April 2018, 363-64 (full text online)
  • ‘The book has something of the virtues of classical philology, such as erudition and close reading of the overall European literary tradition in original languages. It is equally commendable for widening its scope to the literary depictions of exilic experience in often overlooked East and Central European literatures, thus escaping the rather common fault of essentially reducing European intellectual and imaginative experiences to its Western parts.’ — Aleksandar Pavlović, European History Quarterly 48.2, 402-03

Contents:

i-vi
The Rhetoric of Exile: The Rhetoric of Exile
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vii-viii
Table of Contents
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ix-x
Acknowledgements
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1-17
Introduction: the Death of the Exile and Other Riddles
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18-45
Chapter 1 Banished With No Force: Implied Exile in Cicero’s Pro Caecina Oratio
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46-72
Chapter 2 Firebrands of the City: Vicarious Functions of Fire in Exile
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73-106
Chapter 3 the Furies of Orestes: Persecutory Agency in the Narratives of Exile
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107-135
Chapter 4 the Burden of Aeneas: Paternity and Patrimony in Family Exile
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136-164
Chapter 5 Polyglot Monsters: Metalingual Tropes of Force in the Poetry of Exile
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165-167
Afterword
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168-178
Works Cited
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179-186
INDEX
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Bibliography entry:

Zorić, Vladimir, The Rhetoric of Exile: Duress and the Imagining of Force, Studies In Comparative Literature, 39 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2016)

First footnote reference: 35 Vladimir Zorić, The Rhetoric of Exile: Duress and the Imagining of Force, Studies In Comparative Literature, 39 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2016), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Zorić, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Zorić, Vladimir. 2016. The Rhetoric of Exile: Duress and the Imagining of Force, Studies In Comparative Literature, 39 (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Zorić 2016: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Zorić 2016: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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