Residual Figuration in Samuel Beckett and Alberto Giacometti

Lin Li

Studies In Comparative Literature 53

Legenda

  2021

ISBN: 978-1-781886-62-5 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ISBN: 978-1-781886-66-3 (paperback, 2022)

ISBN: 978-1-781886-70-0 (JSTOR ebook)

ModernFrenchDramaArt


In 1945, Swiss sculptor Alberto Giacometti (1901-1966) brought back to Paris six matchboxes filled with the work of his war years: minute figurines that crumbled upon a single touch. Around this time, Irish playwright Samuel Beckett (1906-1989) began writing plays, first with Eleutheria and then Waiting for Godot. When they came together in 1961 to collaborate on a re-staging of Godot, both had turned their attention to different types of figures: Giacometti with lanky, attenuated figures that seem to erode into their environment, and Beckett with increasingly disembodied characters, such as Henry and Ada in Embers. What can we make of this turn in depicting figures that seem to make and unmake themselves in our processes of perceiving them? Through a close examination of Beckett’s dramatic works and Giacometti’s art, Lin Li traces the development of this peculiar type of figuration and uncovers its implications on personhood, rhetoric and inter-medial reading.

Lin Li is research assistant with the MDRN Group at KU Leuven.

Bibliography entry:

Li, Lin, Residual Figuration in Samuel Beckett and Alberto Giacometti, Studies In Comparative Literature, 53 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2021)

First footnote reference: 35 Lin Li, Residual Figuration in Samuel Beckett and Alberto Giacometti, Studies In Comparative Literature, 53 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2021), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Li, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Li, Lin. 2021. Residual Figuration in Samuel Beckett and Alberto Giacometti, Studies In Comparative Literature, 53 (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Li 2021: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Li 2021: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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