Prismatic Translation

Edited by Matthew Reynolds

Transcript 10

Legenda

  7 January 2020  •  396pp

ISBN: 978-1-781887-25-7 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ISBN: 978-1-781887-26-4 (paperback, 2021)  •  RRP £9.99, $12.50, €12.50

ISBN: 978-1-781887-27-1 (JSTOR ebook)

Access online: Books@JSTOR

Translation


Translation can be seen as producing a text in one language that will count as equivalent to a text in another. It can also be seen as a release of multiple signifying possibilities, an opening of the source text to Language in all its plurality. The first view is underpinned by the regime of European standard languages which can be lined up in bilingual dictionaries, by the technology of the printed book, and by the need for regulated communication in political, academic and legal contexts. The second view is most at home in multilingual cultures, in circumstances where language is not standardised (e.g., minority and dialectal communities, and oral cultures), in the fluidity of electronic text, and in literature. The first view sees translation as a channel; the second as a prism.

This volume explores prismatic modes of translation in ancient Egypt, contemporary Taiwan, twentieth-century Hungary, early modern India, and elsewhere. It gives attention to experimental literary writing, to the politics of language, to the practices of scholarship, and to the multiplying possibilities created by digital media. It charts the recent growth of prismatic modes in anglophone literary translation and translational literature; and it offers a new theorisation of the phenomenon and its agonistic relation to the ‘channel’ view. Prismatic Translation is an essential intervention in a rapidly changing field.

Contents:

i-vi
Prismatic Translation: Prismatic Translation
Matthew Reynolds
Cite
vii-viii
Table of Contents
Matthew Reynolds
Cite
ix-ix
Acknowledgements
M. R.
Cite
x-xiv
Notes On the Contributors
Matthew Reynolds
Cite
1-18
Introduction
Matthew Reynolds
Cite
21-48
Chapter 1 Prismatic Agon, Prismatic Harmony: Translation, Literature, Language
Matthew Reynolds
Cite
51-71
Chapter 2 Poetic Traffic in A Multilingual Literary Culture: Equivalence, Parallel Aesthetics, and Language-Stretching in North India
Francesca Orsini
Cite
72-95
Chapter 3 ‘Annihilation Is Atop the Lake’: the Visual Untranslatability of An Ancient Egyptian Short Story
Hany Rashwan
Cite
96-118
Chapter 4 [mirroring] Events at the Sense Horizon: Translation Over Time
John Cayley
Cite
121-139
Chapter 5 Through A Prism, Translated: Culture and Change in Russia
Yvonne Howell
Cite
140-155
Chapter 6 Literary Metatranslations: When Translation Multiples Tell Their Own Story
Kasia Szymanska
Cite
156-172
Chapter 7 Extreme Translation
Adriana X. Jacobs
Cite
173-188
Chapter 8 Translation Poetry: the Poetics of Noise in Hsia Yü’s Pink Noise
Cosima Bruno
Cite
189-204
Chapter 9 Cultural Translation, Or, the Political Logic of Prismatic Translation
Jernej Habjan
Cite
207-220
Chapter 10 the Literary Translator As Dispersive Prism: Refracting and Recomposing Cultures
Jean Anderson
Cite
221-242
Chapter 11 in Words and Colours: Lingo-Visual Translations of the Poetry of Shafii Kadkani
Pari Azarm Motamedi
Cite
243-261
Chapter 12 T Is For Translation(s): Translating Nonsense Alphabets Into French
Audrey Coussy
Cite
262-285
Chapter 13 Algorithmic Translation: New Challenges For Translation in the Age of Algorithms
Eran Hadas
Cite
286-294
Chapter 14 Du Bellay in the Modern University
Philip Terry
Cite
297-311
Chapter 15 Coleridge Diffracted: On the Opening Lines of Kubla Khan
Patrick Hersant
Cite
312-330
Chapter 16 the Hungarian Spectrum of Petronius’s Satyricon
Péter Hajdu
Cite
331-345
Chapter 17 the Schizophrenic Prism: Louis Wolfson’s Translation Practice
Alexandra Lukes
Cite
346-358
Chapter 18 Less Than Paper-Thin: Pseudotranslations, Absent Fathers and Harry Mathews’s Armenian Papers
Dennis Duncan
Cite
359-368
Chapter 19 Original-Esque: Diderot and Goethe in Back-Translation
Stefan Willer
Cite
369-382
Index
Matthew Reynolds
Cite

Bibliography entry:

Reynolds, Matthew (ed.), Prismatic Translation, Transcript, 10 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2020)

First footnote reference: 35 Prismatic Translation, ed. by Matthew Reynolds, Transcript, 10 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2020), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Reynolds, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Reynolds, Matthew (ed.). 2020. Prismatic Translation, Transcript, 10 (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Reynolds 2020: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Reynolds 2020: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


This title is distributed on behalf of MHRA by Ingram’s. Booksellers and libraries can order direct from Ingram by setting up a free ipage® Account: click here for more.


Permanent link to this title: