Phrase and Subject
Studies in Literature and Music

Edited by Delia da Sousa Correa

Legenda (General Series)

Legenda

5 September 2006  •  224pp

ISBN: 978-1-904713-07-4 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

FrenchEnglishFiction


The confluence between music and literature, long hymned as sister arts, is a newly burgeoning field of critical inquiry. This innovative collection of interdisciplinary essays provides a valuable introduction to the field, mapping the contours of recent research and investigating the mutual aesthetic influence of the two arts and their common historical ground. The examination of literary works using music as an analogy for literary composition, and the consideration of musical works whose structure is derived from literary models will excite the interest of both professional scholars and students in the fields of musicology, literary studies and modern European languages.

Delia da Sousa Correa is Lecturer in Literature at The Open University. She is the author of George Eliot, Music and Victorian Culture (2002) and editor of The Nineteenth-Century Novel: Realisms (2000).

Reviews:

  • ‘Largely devoted to questions of narrativity, a disputed area within musicology... An interesting but uneven collection.’ — Julian Rushton, Modern Language Review 103.3, July 2008, 810-11 (full text online)
  • ‘Well-structured and coherent... Building on the important, innovative work of one of the volume’s contributors, Lawrence Kramer, the excellent studies collected here represent a vital overview of fruitful lines of inquiry within a vibrant emerging discipline.’Forum for Modern Language Studies April 2009, 220)

Contents:

1-10
Introduction
Delia da Sousa Correa
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Part I: Theoretical Issues
12-20
Stances towards Music as a Language
Daniel Albright
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21-33
Music before the Literary: Or, the Eventness of Musical Events
Anthony Gritten
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34-44
Music in the Philosophical Imagination: Deconstructing Friedrich Nietzsche’s Human, All Too Human
Tina Frühauf
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45-58
The Force of Music in Derrida’s Writing
Peter Dayan
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Part II: Generic Alliances
60-72
Music and Realism: Samuel Richardson, Italian Opera, and English Oratorio
Lawrence Woof
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73-86
Saving the Ordinary: Beethoven’s ‘Ghost’ Trio and the Wheel of History
Lawrence Kramer
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87-98
Musical Scores and Literary Form in Modernism: Ezra Pound’s Pisan Cantos and Samuel Beckett’s Watt
Mark Byron
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Part III: The Gendered Text
100-111
Revoicing Rousseau: Staël’s Corinne and the Song of the South
Tili Boon Cuillé
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112-124
The Dear Dead Past: The Piano in Victorian and Edwardian Poetry
Regula Hohl Trillini
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125-134
Music and Kate Chopin’s The Awakening
Sue Asbee, Tom Cooper
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135-146
Narratives of Masculinity and Femininity: Two Schumann Song Cycles
Robert Samuels
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Part IV: Narrative Modes
148-152
The Concert as a Literary Genre: Berlioz’s Lélio
Guillaume Bordry
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153-166
Literature as Déjà vu? The Third Movement of Gustav Mahler’s First Symphony
Federico Celestini
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167-177
Fugue or Music Drama? Symmetry, Counterpoint, and Leitmotif in Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov
Rosamund Bartlett
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178-192
Benjamin Britten and Wilfred Owen: An Intertextual Reading of the War Requiem
David Crilly
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Bibliography entry:

Correa, Delia da Sousa (ed.), Phrase and Subject: Studies in Literature and Music (Cambridge: Legenda, 2006)

First footnote reference: 35 Phrase and Subject: Studies in Literature and Music, ed. by Delia da Sousa Correa (Cambridge: Legenda, 2006), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Correa, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Correa, Delia da Sousa (ed.). 2006. Phrase and Subject: Studies in Literature and Music (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Correa 2006: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Correa 2006: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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