Cultural Reception, Translation and Transformation from Medieval to Modern Italy
Essays in Honour of Martin McLaughlin

Edited by Guido Bonsaver, Brian Richardson, and Giuseppe Stellardi

Legenda (General Series)

Legenda

17 May 2017  •  476pp

ISBN: 978-1-781884-69-0 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ISBN: 978-1-781884-70-6 (paperback, 30 September 2018)  •  RRP £14.99, $19.99, €19.99

ISBN: 978-1-781884-71-3 (JSTOR ebook)

Access online: Books@JSTOR

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Throughout the centuries, the Italian peninsula has played an important role as a crossroads where different cultures met, transformed and continued their journeys. This volume retraces some of these crossings, in the fields of literature, architecture and cinema: from the influence of the classical heritage, to the origins and diffusion of the Italian Renaissance, to the role of individuals in the discovery and transmission of knowledge, and the dialogue in and through translation with other national cultures, European and beyond.

The volume marks the retirement of Martin McLaughlin from the Agnelli-Serena Chair of Italian Studies at the University of Oxford and celebrates his highly distinguished career in Italian studies. Professor McLaughlin’s research has ranged from classical literatures to the Renai­ssance and to modern and contemporary literature. He has published a host of ground-breaking books, edited volumes, articles and book chapters on a wide range of topics, as well as outstanding translations of Calvino and Eco. No less significant have been his teaching, his roles in the running of academic journals and monograph series, and his contributions to the life of the academic community.

Reviews:

  • ‘A remarkable unified collection... [the essays] may be read in any order, so rich and abundant are the resonances among them.’ — Carmine G. Di Biase, Times Literary Supplement 8 May 2018
  • ‘Zygmunt G. Barański presents a deeply contextualized understanding of the Orpheus myth in Petrarch’s Canzoniere, taking into account Virgilian and Ovidian antecedents, and the traces of their elaboration in works including the Bucolicum carmen and Familiares. At the heart of his essay, Barański boldly, but not unpersuasively, asserts Petrarch’s lyric collection of fragments to be “the great overlooked Orphic text of the Western tradition”. Brian Richardson’s essay is also among the most ambitious, tackling a massive quantity of Renaissance Italian poetic production—extempore Latin and vernacular lyric compositions—and he does so with aplomb, providing perhaps the first categorization with a qualitative/theoretical valuation of this important but almost entirely overlooked subgenre of poetry... Meriting special distinction, Peter Hainsworth’s contribution rescues John Dickson Batten’s illustrations to Dante’s Inferno (1897–1900) from their relative oblivion.’ — Sherry Roush, Renaissance Quarterly 71.9, October 2018, 1193-95
  • ‘The scope, historical locus and chronological ambition of the present volume are exceptionally wide and rich... The quality of the contributions is invariably high and all are case-studies relevant to the book’s central preoccupation with cultural contact and interchange... an admirable collection, full of stimulus and surprises, handsomely produced by Legenda.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 54.2, July 2019, 265-66 (full text online)
  • ‘This volume brings to mind one of Calvino’s own definitions, in his Why Read The Classics?: ‘The classics are those books which come to us bearing the aura of previous interpretations, and trailing behind them the traces they have left in the culture or cultures (or just in the language and customs) through which they have passed’ (McLaughlin’s translation). The volume invites readers into the palimpsest that is Italian culture, which is to say, among other things, its imitations, its intertextuality and transmediality, and its translations.’ — Antonella Braida, Translation and Literature 29, 2020, 291-96 (full text online)
  • ‘The volume reads as a user guide to the most updated views on literary theory and cultural studies, demonstrating how ‘open’ a field Italian studies has become in recent years. Texts—in a semiological sense, hence comprising all meaningful artefacts of culture—are scrutinized through a wide range of approaches, including linguistic, philological, thematic, intertextual, historical, sociological, comparative. and hermeneutical.’ — Oscar Schiavone, Modern Language Review 115.3, July 2020, 737-41 (full text online)

Contents:

i-vi
Cultural Reception, Translation and Transformation from Medieval to Modern Italy: Cultural Reception, Translation and Transformation from Medieval to Modern Italy
Guido Bonsaver, Brian Richardson, Giuseppe Stellardi
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vii-viii
Table of Contents
Guido Bonsaver, Brian Richardson, Giuseppe Stellardi
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ix-xiv
Notes On Contributors
Guido Bonsaver, Brian Richardson, Giuseppe Stellardi
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xv-xvi
List of Figures
Guido Bonsaver, Brian Richardson, Giuseppe Stellardi
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xvii-xxvii
Introduction
Guido Bonsaver, Brian Richardson, Giuseppe Stellardi
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xxviii-xxxii
Bibliography of Publications By Martin Mclaughlin
Guido Bonsaver, Brian Richardson, Giuseppe Stellardi
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1-24
Chapter 1 ‘Io Mi Rivolgo Indietro A Ciascun Passo’ (rvf 15. 1): Petrarch, the Fabula of Eurydice and Orpheus and the Structure of the Canzoniere
Zygmunt G. Barański
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25-39
Chapter 2 Boccaccio’s ‘Spirante Turbo’: An Intertextual Defence of Tolerance
Elisabetta Tarantino
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40-51
Chapter 3 Beyond Borghini: the Oxford Manuscript of Sacchetti’s Novelle and Their New Critical Edition
Michelangelo Zaccarello
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52-68
Chapter 4 Why Retranslate the Classics? Griselda in French From the Renaissance To the Twentieth Century
Guido Bonsaver, Brian Richardson, Giuseppe Stellardi
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69-83
Chapter 5 La Raffigurazione Del Potere Nell’orlando Furioso
Marco Dorigatti
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84-96
Chapter 6 Intricate Intertextuality: Lucan’s Wood in Ariosto and Tasso
Elena Lombardi
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97-116
Chapter 7 Improvising Lyric Verse in the Renaissance: Contexts, Sources and Composition
Brian Richardson
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117-135
Chapter 8 Piero Vettori and France
Richard Cooper
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136-149
Chapter 9 From Shadows Towards Light: Transformations of Allegorical Journeys in Dialogue Ii of Giordano Bruno’s Cena De Le Ceneri
Hilary Gatti
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150-157
Chapter 10 Sebastiano Serlio: Giudizio, Mescolanza, Invenzione
Francesco Paolo Fiore
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158-172
Chapter 11 Giacomo Leoni: Unsung Intermediary Between Alberti and Palladio
John Woodhouse
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173-187
Chapter 12 Repurposing Renaissance Literature For Language Learning: Giuseppe Baretti’s An Introduction To the Italian Language (1755)
Vilma De Gasperin
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188-198
Chapter 13 Goldoni and Gozzi: Disquisition On A Statue That Walks
Joseph Farrell
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199-214
Chapter 14 Romantic, Romantico, Romanzesco: An Aspect of Walter Scott’s Reception in Italy
David Robey
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215-238
Chapter 15 Hypatia of Alexandria, Pagan Or Christian? Propaganda Wars Between John Toland’s Hypatia of 1720 and Diodata Saluzzo’s Ipazia of 1827
Letizia Panizza
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239-256
Chapter 16 John Dickson Batten’s Illustrations To the Inferno
Peter Hainsworth
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257-271
Chapter 17 Turns of Chance: Modern Luck and Italian Modernism (marinetti, Montale, Pirandello)
Robert S. C. Gordon
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272-286
Chapter 18 Johnny’s Epic Resistance: Classical Echoes in Fenoglio’s Il Partigiano Johnny
Rosalba Biasini
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287-298
Chapter 19 Una Questioncella Privata: Su Un Racconto Inedito Di Italo Calvino
Mario Barenghi
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299-314
Chapter 20 Calvino’s Il Barone Rampante and Leopardi’s Elogio Degli Uccelli
Emanuela Tandello Cooper
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315-330
Chapter 21 Transformations in the Giallo: Italo Calvino’s Metafictional Anti-Detective Novel Se Una Notte D’inverno Un Viaggiatore (1979)
Helen Anderson
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331-351
Chapter 22 ‘Senti ’n Po’, A Gregori Pècche…’: Shavelson’s It Started in Naples and Fellini’s La Dolce Vita Between Italian and U.s. Culture
Guido Bonsaver
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352-366
Chapter 23 Diffracting Dante’s Paradiso With Pasolini and Morante: Transformation, Identity and the Form of Desire
Manuele Gragnolati
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367-382
Chapter 24 ‘Poetry Is Not Eggs’: Luigi Meneghello On Italian and Foreign Poetry, Translation and ‘Transplants’
Diego Zancani
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383-394
Chapter 25 ‘Double Trouble’: Giampaolo Pansa’s Il Sangue Dei Vinti From Novel To Film
Philip Cooke
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395-409
Chapter 26 Controtendenze Narrative Novecentesche: La Storia Romanzo Di Elsa Morante
Franca Pellegrini
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410-423
Chapter 27 Fragments of (urban) Space and (human) Time: Gadda’s Poetics (with Baudelaire and Benjamin)
Giuseppe Stellardi
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424-434
Chapter 28 Il Mistero Dei Due Anelli: Una Postilla Sopra La Natura Del Discorso Letterario, Da Virgilio A Calvino
Nicola Gardini
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435-436
A Note On Legenda
Guido Bonsaver, Brian Richardson, Giuseppe Stellardi
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437-444
Index
Guido Bonsaver, Brian Richardson, Giuseppe Stellardi
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Bibliography entry:

Bonsaver, Guido, Brian Richardson, and Giuseppe Stellardi (eds), Cultural Reception, Translation and Transformation from Medieval to Modern Italy: Essays in Honour of Martin McLaughlin (Cambridge: Legenda, 2017)

First footnote reference: 35 Cultural Reception, Translation and Transformation from Medieval to Modern Italy: Essays in Honour of Martin McLaughlin, ed. by Guido Bonsaver, Brian Richardson, and Giuseppe Stellardi (Cambridge: Legenda, 2017), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Bonsaver, Richardson, and Stellardi, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Bonsaver, Guido, Brian Richardson, and Giuseppe Stellardi (eds). 2017. Cultural Reception, Translation and Transformation from Medieval to Modern Italy: Essays in Honour of Martin McLaughlin (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Bonsaver, Richardson, and Stellardi 2017: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Bonsaver, Richardson, and Stellardi 2017: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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