The Modern Spanish Canon
Visibility, Cultural Capital and the Academy

Edited by Stuart Davis and Maite Usoz de la Fuente

Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 28

Legenda

22 August 2018  •  178pp

ISBN: 978-1-781885-29-1 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ISBN: 978-1-781885-30-7 (paperback, 7 October 2020  )  •  RRP £9.99, $12.50, €12.50

ISBN: 978-1-781885-31-4 (JSTOR ebook)

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In recent years, interdisciplinary and comparative outlooks, greatly facilitated by the advent of new technologies, have transformed the discipline of Spanish Studies, leading to a re-evaluation of its scope and boundaries. To what extent is it legitimate to speak of ‘Spanish Studies’, given the linguistic and cultural diversity of Spain and the increasingly globalised nature of the world in which we live? How have digital technologies transformed the discipline, and, indeed, its objects of study? Have our methodologies and vocabulary kept apace with these advances? How do recent changes affect our access to and interpretation of cultural texts, past and present? And conversely: how do current re-evaluations of the past affect our understanding of the present? Thirteen early career researchers grapple with these and other questions in a collection of essays that elucidate the ways in which emerging scholars negotiate the urge to revise, re-shape or challenge the canon (transforming their discipline in the process), with the need to integrate their discourse within existing disciplinary boundaries.

Stuart Davis is Senior Lecturer in Spanish, Girton College, and Newton Trust Lecturer in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Cambridge. Maite Usoz de la Fuente is Lecturer in Spanish at the University of Leicester.

Reviews:

  • ‘This volume showcases the work of early-career scholars working in modern peninsular Spanish studies as they seek a breakthrough into the institutional realm of the contemporary academy. It comprises ten essays ordered and presented by the editors, who, in a spirited Introduction, identify fundamental questions and issues ranging from nomenclature (Spanish Studies? Iberian Studies?) and the politics of the discipline, to ownership and the constitution of the canon.’ — Robin Fiddian, Hispanic Research Journal 20.4, 2019, 416-17 (full text online)
  • ‘A welcome and handsome contribution to debates on the limits, possibilities and opportunities for current and future research on the modern Spanish cultural canon... An excellent vision of the vibrant health of early-career Hispanism and a thought-provoking challenge to established critical paradigms... this volume is testament to a very bright and innovative future for our discipline.’ — Alison Ribeiro de Menezes, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 96.9, 2019, 1557-58

Contents:

i-vi
The Modern Spanish Canon: The Modern Spanish Canon
Stuart Davis, Maite Usoz de la Fuente
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vii-viii
Table of Contents
Stuart Davis, Maite Usoz de la Fuente
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ix-ix
Acknowledgements
S. D., M. F.
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x-xii
Notes On the Contributors
Stuart Davis, Maite Usoz de la Fuente
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1-11
Introduction: Visibility, Cultural Capital and the Academy
Stuart Davis, Maite Usoz de la Fuente
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12-24
Chapter 1 New Cartographies of Hispanism: From Spanish To Iberian Literary History?
Santiago Pérez Isasi
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25-36
Chapter 2 Mare Memoriae: Kirmen Uribe’s Memorial Seascapes
Daniela Omlor
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37-57
Chapter 3 Becoming Undone: Colour, Matter and Line in the Artwork of Marcellí Antúnez
Eva Bru-Domínguez
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58-71
Chapter 4 Out of Time: Julia De Asensi and the Historical Legend
Rocío Rødtjer
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72-91
Chapter 5 Undermining the Discourse of the Spanish Transition: Literary Approaches To Forgetting, Consensus and ‘the New Spain’
Leticia Blanco
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92-106
Chapter 6 Fascinated By Observation: Amalia Domingo Soler and Vicente Manterola’s Debates On Spiritism in Late Nineteenth-Century Spain
Marta Ferrer
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107-120
Chapter 7 Facha If You Do, Coward If You Don’t? the Problematic Canonicity of Francoist Authors in Post-Franco Spain
David Jiménez Torres
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121-135
Chapter 8 the Unfortunate Case of Heritage Screen Media: Dismissal, Denial and Definition
Laura J. Lee Kemp
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136-147
Chapter 9 the Gypsies According To No-Do: the Image of Spanish Roma From Dictatorship To Democracy
Lidia Merás
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148-157
Chapter 10 Constructing A Feminist Room of Her Own: the Marketing and Reception of María Xosé Queizán
Jennifer Rodríguez
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158-166
Index
Stuart Davis, Maite Usoz de la Fuente
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Bibliography entry:

Davis, Stuart, and Maite Usoz de la Fuente (eds), The Modern Spanish Canon: Visibility, Cultural Capital and the Academy, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 28 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2018)

First footnote reference: 35 The Modern Spanish Canon: Visibility, Cultural Capital and the Academy, ed. by Stuart Davis and Maite Usoz de la Fuente, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 28 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2018), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Davis and Fuente, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Davis, Stuart, and Maite Usoz de la Fuente (eds). 2018. The Modern Spanish Canon: Visibility, Cultural Capital and the Academy, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 28 (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Davis and Fuente 2018: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Davis and Fuente 2018: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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