Method and Variation
Narrative in Early Modern French Thought

Edited by Emma Gilby and Paul White

Legenda (General Series)

Legenda

28 May 2013  •  132pp

ISBN: 978-1-907975-36-3 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

EnlightenmentFrenchPhilosophyFiction


The keywords of classical narrative theory – fable, history, and argument – open up enquiries into literality and fictiveness for subsequent generations of thinkers. This collection of essays explores the place of such enquiries in early modern French thought, spanning authors as diverse as Montaigne, Descartes, La Rochefoucauld, Mme de Villedieu, and Mme de Lafayette. How is the language of verisimilitude, veracity, proof, and invention embedded across genres and media? How do the explorations of fictional texts contribute in significant ways to the terms in which philosophical debates are conducted? How do different kinds of digressive or anecdotal narrative feed back into more abstract analyses? What does it mean to read what we would term ‘philosophical’ texts in a ‘literary’ way? We bring together some of the most distinguished and exciting scholars working in the field of early modern French Studies today.

Emma Gilby is Senior Lecturer in French, University of Cambridge. Paul White is Temporary Lecturer in French, University of Cambridge.

Reviews:

  • ‘Overall, this is an engaging volume that usefully emphasizes the narrative methods and less scientific genres which underlie early modern French thought and its philosophical fictions.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.2, April 2014, 230-31
  • ‘This timely and important volume addresses the role of narration in revealing early modern French belief patterns... In demonstrating the range of ways in which early modern authors reconfigure and renegotiate narrative’s relationship to thought, argument, and proof, the contributors to this volume together add critical understanding to the complex articulation of fable, history, and argument in the early modern period.’ — Allison Stedman, French Studies 68.4, October 2014, 542-43

Contents:

1-10
Introduction
Emma Gilby, Paul White
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11-22
Sun Worshippers
John O'Brien
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23-40
Anecdote, Example, Method: Renaissance Accounts of the Death of Pliny the Elder
Rowan Tomlinson
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41-54
Image and Idolatry: The Case of Louis Richeome
Anthony Ossa-Richardson
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55-68
The Book of Nature and the Book of Metaphors
Alexander Roose
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69-78
Anecdotes and Affects
Michael Moriarty
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79-88
Novel proofs: Villedieu’s Les Désordres de l’amour
Katherine Ibbett
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89-102
François Bernier: Philosophers’ Fictions / Traveller’s Visions
Isabelle Moreau
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103-116
Language, Image and the Double
John D. Lyons
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Bibliography entry:

Gilby, Emma, and Paul White (eds), Method and Variation: Narrative in Early Modern French Thought (Cambridge: Legenda, 2013)

First footnote reference: 35 Method and Variation: Narrative in Early Modern French Thought, ed. by Emma Gilby and Paul White (Cambridge: Legenda, 2013), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Gilby and White, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Gilby, Emma, and Paul White (eds). 2013. Method and Variation: Narrative in Early Modern French Thought (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Gilby and White 2013: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Gilby and White 2013: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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