Mediterranean Travels
Writing Self and Other from the Ancient World to Contemporary Society

Edited by Patrick Crowley, Noreen Humble and Silvia Ross

Legenda (General Series)

Legenda

26 August 2011  •  256pp

ISBN: 978-1-907975-07-3 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ItalianLife-WritingTravel


Across time the Mediterranean has been a zone of variable intensities, alliances and tensions: it is where the continents of Europe, Africa and Asia meet, it is where North faces South in an asymmetrical relationship. Its histories—of Greece and Rome, of Christianity and Islam, of modernity and tradition—have evolved through exploration, trade, pilgrimage, imperial expansion, imaginings, vacation and migration. Travellers to this compelling region have recorded their journeys and their encounters with the Other in a variety of modes that have also revealed as much about themselves. Written by leading scholars in the field, this collection analyzes the notion of travel writing as a genre, while tracing significant examples of Mediterranean travel writing that return us to Ancient Greece, to Medieval pilgrimages, to Venetians’ diplomatic missions, to an Egyptian’s account of Paris in the nineteenth century, to French artistic journeys in North Africa and to contemporary narratives of privileged resettlement, death, and dislocation.

Patrick Crowley teaches French and Francophone literature at University College Cork. Noreen Humble teaches Classics at the University of Calgary. Silvia Ross teaches Italian Literature at University College Cork.

Contents:

1-13
Introduction: The Mediterranean Turn
Patrick Crowley, Noreen Humble, Silvia Ross
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14-31
Xenophon’s Anabasis: Self and Other in Fourth-Century Greece
Noreen Humble
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32-46
Pausanias’s Description of Greece: Back to the Roots of Greek Culture
Maria Pretzler
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47-60
The Inception of Oriental Doxology: European Pilgrimages to the Holy Land, before and during the Crusades
Suha Kudsieh
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61-76
Renaissance Travellers in the Mediterranean and their Perception of the Other
Daria Perocco
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77-95
The Fleeting Concept of the Other in the Turkish Letters of Augerius Busbequius (1520/1–1591)
Zweder Von Martels
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96-113
Writing the Mediterranean in Italian Baroque Travel Literature: Pietro Della Valle’s Viaggi
Nathalie Hester
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114-133
‘Extracting Gold’ from Paris: A Nineteenth-Century Egyptian Journey in Search of Knowledge
Roxanne L. Euben
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134-145
Encounters with Self and Others: Some English Women Travellers to Italy in the Nineteenth Century
Susan Bassnett
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146-161
Eugène Fromentin: Travel, Algeria, and the Pursuit of Aesthetic Form
Patrick Crowley
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162-179
‘Already familiar and yet fantastically new’: Jacques Lacarrière and the Mediterranean
Charles Forsdick
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180-196
The Mediterranean Diet: Consuming the Italian Other’s Culture in Travel Writing by Frances Mayes and Gary Paul Nabhan
Silvia Ross
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197-208
Deciphering the Past, Interpreting the Present: Self and Identity in Mediterráneos by Rafael Chirbes
Martín Veiga
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209-222
Grave Unquiet: The Mediterranean and its Dead
Derek Duncan
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Bibliography entry:

Crowley, Patrick, Noreen Humble, and Silvia Ross (eds), Mediterranean Travels: Writing Self and Other from the Ancient World to Contemporary Society (Cambridge: Legenda, 2011)

First footnote reference: 35 Mediterranean Travels: Writing Self and Other from the Ancient World to Contemporary Society, ed. by Patrick Crowley, Noreen Humble and Silvia Ross (Cambridge: Legenda, 2011), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Crowley, Humble, and Ross, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Crowley, Patrick, Noreen Humble, and Silvia Ross (eds). 2011. Mediterranean Travels: Writing Self and Other from the Ancient World to Contemporary Society (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Crowley, Humble, and Ross 2011: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Crowley, Humble, and Ross 2011: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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