Le Gouvernement présent, ou éloge de son Eminence, satyre ou la Miliade

Edited by Paul Scott

Critical Texts 14

Modern Humanities Research Association

1 October 2010  •  208pp

ISBN: 978-0-947623-77-7 (paperback)  •  RRP £10.99, $17.50, €13.99

ISBN: 978-1-122999-12-0 (Google ebook)  •  RRP £4.95

Sample: Google Books

RenaissanceFrenchHistory


This satirical poem, known popularly as the Miliade because of its thousand-verse length was printed anonymously around 1636. It was subsequently reprinted several times under varying titles, knowing fresh success from 1649 to 1652 when it was reissued as a pseudo-Mazarinade. This is an important work since Tallemant des Réaux tells us that Richelieu was particularly incensed by it and had at least five authors imprisoned on suspicion of having authored it (including the prominent comic dramatist Charles de Beys). Tallemant also mentions that its popularity was widespread, detailing that readers had to peruse illicit copies behind closed doors. The poem's endurance and plentiful and specific political references - battles are detailed, ministers, writers and other figures are directly or indirectly alluded to - make it a lively commentary encompassing discontent with the increasingly centralized government before the outbreak of the civil wars, the Frondes (1648-53).

This volume provides an accessible edition with scholarly apparatus based on the first printing, with variants from later printings and manuscripts listed as footnotes. The annotated marginal comments of Tallemant des Réaux to his own copy of the manuscript of the poem are provided, this being the first time they have been published. The editor also evaluates the contenders for authorship and, based on both internal stylistic evidence as well as contemporary clues, reaches a decisive conclusion as to the authorship, date of appearance, and place of publication, unravelling a literary mystery that Richelieu himself, with his wide intelligence network, was never able to resolve.

Paul Scott is assistant professor in the Department of French and Italian at the University of Kansas.

deserves our attention today as not only the first significant satire since the years of the Catholic League in the 1580s, but also the pamphlet that, in an increasingly centralized and controlled public sphere, made an audacious claim for the possibility of resistance ... This erudite edition will interest students of seventeenth-century history, literature, and all those interested in the history of political dissent" Antonia Szabari, Renaissance Quarterly, 67 (2014), 565-6.

"Paul Scott’s edition is both meticulous and erudite ... [the] astute analysis of the political and literary significance of the poem will be of broad interest to scholars who work on the political and cultural history of early modern France." Peter Shoemaker, MLR, 107 (2012), 618-20.

Reviews:

  • ‘Paul Scott’s edition is both meticulous and erudite ... [the] astute analysis of the political and literary significance of the poem will be of broad interest to scholars who work on the political and cultural history of early modern France.’ — Peter Shoemaker, Modern Language Review 107.2, 2012, 618-20 (full text online)
  • ‘The editor convincingly argues that the Miliade deserves our attention today as not only the first significant satire since the years of the Catholic League in the 1580s, but also the pamphlet that, in an increasingly centralized and controlled public sphere, made an audacious claim for the possibility of resistance ... This erudite edition will interest students of seventeenth-century history, literature, and all those interested in the history of political dissent.’ — Antonia Szabari, Renaissance Quarterly 67, 2014, 565-66
  • ‘Après 90 pages de riche présentation, l’édition elle-même occupe 30 pages complétées de d’autant de notes (32 pages) qui en permettent la plus exacte compréhension ... [une] excellente édition.’ — Françoise Hildesheimer, Dix-septième siècle 258, 2013, 171-72
  • ‘In this impeccably researched new edition, editor Paul Scott shows exactly why this pamphlet should be taken seriously ... I have no doubt that this edition will be essential reading for all scholars of the period.’ — Nicholas Hammond, Seventeenth Century XXVII, 2012, 246-47

Bibliography entry:

Scott, Paul (ed.), Le Gouvernement présent, ou éloge de son Eminence, satyre ou la Miliade, Critical Texts, 14 (Cambridge: MHRA, 2010)

First footnote reference: 35 Le Gouvernement présent, ou éloge de son Eminence, satyre ou la Miliade, ed. by Paul Scott, Critical Texts, 14 (Cambridge: MHRA, 2010), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Scott, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Scott, Paul (ed.). 2010. Le Gouvernement présent, ou éloge de son Eminence, satyre ou la Miliade, Critical Texts, 14 (Cambridge: MHRA)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Scott 2010: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Scott 2010: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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