José Saramago
History, Utopia, and the Necessity of Error

Mark Sabine

Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 23

Legenda

19 December 2016  •  292pp

ISBN: 978-1-781884-53-9 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ISBN: 978-1-781884-54-6 (paperback, 30 September 2018)  •  RRP £9.99, $12.50, €12.50

ISBN: 978-1-781884-55-3 (JSTOR ebook)

Access online: Books@JSTOR

ContemporaryPortugueseFictionstudent-priced


In addition to its original library hardback edition, this title is now on sale in the new student-priced Legenda paperback range.


Although best known internationally for his ‘allegorical’ novels such as Blindness (1995), in his native Portugal, José Saramago remains most acclaimed for his earlier, richly poetic ‘historical’ novels. This new study of five of these works focuses on José Saramago's engagement with political and social philosophy from across Europe, so as to track his commitment to libertarian socialism in an era of neo-liberal economics and disillusion. Though deeply pessimistic about human being’s capacity to deliver social justice, Saramago never abandons the progressive cause. Making use of insights from Gramsci, Walter Benjamin, and Marcuse, among others, this study argues that Saramago sought to engage his reader with a skeptical but vibrant utopianism: teaching us to abandon absolutes and embrace error as inevitable, and, indeed, even necessary. From this post-humanist perspective, humanity becomes understood as ongoing project rather than essence, challenging individuals to strive for self-knowledge and reinvention.

Mark Sabine is Lecturer in Lusophone Studies at the University of Nottingham.

Reviews:

  • ‘Beyond providing a rigorous, detailed and elegant analysis of those novels, Sabine offers a model for reading Saramago that will serve as reference point for any future work.’ — Paulo de Medeiros, Bulletin of Hispanic Studies 95, 2018, 579-80
  • ‘This volume is of tremendous use to both seasoned scholars of Saramago and those who, like many in the English-speaking world, are familiar only with his later novels.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 54.3, July 2018, 377
  • ‘Likely to be welcomed by specialists and non-specialists looking for a critical grounding in the author’s initial and decisive novels of the 1980s.’ — Ana Paula Ferreira, Journal of Lusophone Studies 4.2, 2019, 299-301 (full text online)
  • ‘From a broad perspective which accepts the idea of an inherent political project and its utopian message, this book excellently resumes the possible justifications, together with scholarly well founded contextualizations, thus offering an outstandingly solid basis from which to depart towards further fruitful debates.’ — Burghard Baltrusch, Portuguese Studies 36.1, July 2020, 115-19 (full text online)

Contents:

i-vi
José Saramago: José Saramago
Mark Sabine
Cite
vii-viii
Table of Contents
Mark Sabine
Cite
ix-x
Acknowledgements
Mark Sabine
Cite
xi-xii
Notes On the Text
Mark Sabine
Cite
1-28
Introduction
Mark Sabine
Cite
29-70
Chapter 1 Levantado Do Chão
Mark Sabine
Cite
71-117
Chapter 2 Memorial Do Convento
Mark Sabine
Cite
118-159
Chapter 3 O Ano Da Morte De Ricardo Reis
Mark Sabine
Cite
160-204
Chapter 4 A Jangada De Pedra
Mark Sabine
Cite
205-242
Chapter 5 História Do Cerco De Lisboa
Mark Sabine
Cite
243-250
Afterword
Mark Sabine
Cite
251-270
Bibliography
Mark Sabine
Cite
271-280
Index
Mark Sabine
Cite

Bibliography entry:

Sabine, Mark, José Saramago: History, Utopia, and the Necessity of Error, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 23 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2016)

First footnote reference: 35 Mark Sabine, José Saramago: History, Utopia, and the Necessity of Error, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 23 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2016), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Sabine, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Sabine, Mark. 2016. José Saramago: History, Utopia, and the Necessity of Error, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 23 (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Sabine 2016: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Sabine 2016: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


This title is distributed on behalf of MHRA by Ingram’s. Booksellers and libraries can order direct from Ingram by setting up a free ipage® Account: click here for more.


Permanent link to this title: