The Italian Academies 1525-1700
Networks of Culture, Innovation and Dissent

Edited by Jane E. Everson, Denis V. Reidy and Lisa Sampson

Italian Perspectives 31

Legenda

1 September 2016  •  366pp

ISBN: 978-1-909662-57-5 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ISBN: 978-1-315559-78-0 (Taylor & Francis ebook)

ItalianCriticismLettersPhilosophy


The intellectual societies known as Academies played a vital role in the development of culture, and scholarly debate throughout Italy between 1525-1700. They were fundamental in establishing the intellectual networks later defined as the ‘République des Lettres’, and in the dissemination of ideas in early modern Europe, through print, manuscript, oral debate and performance. This volume surveys the social and cultural role of Academies, challenging received ideas and incorporating recent archival findings on individuals, networks and texts.

Ranging over Academies in both major and smaller or peripheral centres, these collected studies explore the interrelationships of Academies with other cultural forums. Individual essays examine the fluid nature of academies and their changing relationships to the political authorities; their role in the promotion of literature, the visual arts and theatre; and the diverse membership recorded for many academies, which included scientists, writers, printers, artists, political and religious thinkers, and, unusually, a number of talented women. Contributions by established international scholars together with studies by younger scholars active in this developing field of research map out new perspectives on the dynamic place of the Academies in early modern Italy.

The publication results from the research collaboration ‘The Italian Academies 1525-1700: the first intellectual networks of early modern Europe’ funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and is edited by the senior investigators.

Contents:

1-20
Introduction
Jane E. Everson, Lisa Sampson
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Part I: Academies and the Political Environment
22-37
Defining the Place of Academies in Florentine Culture and Politics
Alison Brown
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38-52
Pro- and anti-Medici? Political Ambivalence and Social Integration in the Accademia degli Alterati (Florence, 1569–c. 1625)
Déborah Blocker
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53-61
Accademie senesi: tramonto e alba di una respublica litteraria
Germano Pallini
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62-76
Reforming Theatre in Farnese Parma: The Case of the Accademia degli Innominati (1574–1608)
Lisa Sampson
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77-86
The Accademia della Fucina: Culture and Politics in Seventeenth-Century Messina
Salvatore Bottari
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Part II: Academies and Religion in Counter-Reformation Culture
88-101
The Accademia della Virtù and Religious Dissent
Ambra Moroncini
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102-117
A Ghost Academy between Venice and Brescia: Philosophical Scepticism and Religious Heterodoxy in the Accademia dei Dubbiosi
Marco Faini
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118-130
Between Church, University and Academies: Paolo Beni in Padua, 1599–1623
Maurizio Sangalli
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Part III: Organisation, Configuration and Membership
132-169
Members, Muses, Mascots: Women and Italian Academies
Virginia Cox
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170-185
The Accademia di San Luca between Educational and Religious Reform
Peter M. Lukehart
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186-196
‘Nec longum tempus’: l’Accademia dei Gelati tra xvi e xvii secolo (1588–1614)
Clizia Gurreri
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197-212
Italian Academies and their ‘Facebooks’
Simone Testa
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Part IV: Literature and the Arts: Experimentation, Innovation and Production
214-232
Accademia come palestra e come tribuna: Girolamo Ruscelli sdegnato, ardente, dubbioso, fratteggiano
Paolo Procaccioli
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233-244
L’Accademia Palermitana degli Accesi: un esempio di petrarchismo nel tardo Cinquecento
Irene Bagni
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245-257
Da Francesco Petrarca a Giovan Battista Marino: l’Accademia degli Insensati di Perugia (1561–1608)
Lorenzo Sacchini
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258-276
Bronzino e l’Accademia Fiorentina
Carla Chiummo
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277-291
La poesia funebre all’Accademia Olimpica di Vicenza
Paule Desmoulière
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292-305
Dee, imperatrici, cortigiane: la natura della donna nei romanzi degli Incogniti (Venezia)
Paola Cosentino
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306-315
Appendix: A New Resource for the Italian Academies. ‘Accademie siciliane 1400–1701’: Una nuova bancadati bio-bibliografica
Delphine Montoliu
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Bibliography entry:

Everson, Jane E., Denis V. Reidy, and Lisa Sampson (eds), The Italian Academies 1525-1700: Networks of Culture, Innovation and Dissent, Italian Perspectives, 31 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2016)

First footnote reference: 35 The Italian Academies 1525-1700: Networks of Culture, Innovation and Dissent, ed. by Jane E. Everson, Denis V. Reidy and Lisa Sampson, Italian Perspectives, 31 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2016), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Everson, Reidy, and Sampson, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Everson, Jane E., Denis V. Reidy, and Lisa Sampson (eds). 2016. The Italian Academies 1525-1700: Networks of Culture, Innovation and Dissent, Italian Perspectives, 31 (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Everson, Reidy, and Sampson 2016: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Everson, Reidy, and Sampson 2016: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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