Heine und die Weltliteratur

Edited by T. J. Reed and Alexander Stillmark

Legenda (General Series)

Legenda

1 June 2000  •  240pp

ISBN: 1-900755-16-5 (paperback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

EnlightenmentGermanPoetry


The 1997 London Heine Conference brought together leading scholars and critics from Austria, Britain and Germany. The essays collected in this volume offer a broad canvas of Heine's themes and techniques, his debts and his influence, the ancient and modern connections of his work, its epic and lyrical forms, together with materials and comparisons drawn from English, German, Russian, Jewish and Islamic sources, and the musical settings of his poems. The collection complements recent scholarship, much of which has explored Heine's theoretical and other prose works, by paying close attention once more to the inexhaustible riches of his poetry.

Reviews:

  • ‘Heine was a great reader in the literary patrimony. Every study of his reading experience from youth to deathbed has expanded its dimensions... an admirable volume.’ — Jeffrey L. Sammons, Modern Language Review 97.1, 2002, 228-9 (full text online)
  • Vridhagiri Ganeshan, Germanistik 42.3-4, 2001, 737
  • ‘In a richly diverse range of approaches, a number of new readings of the poems are offered... demonstrates the arresting power of the poet.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies xxxix/1, 2003, 104
  • ‘The volume provides much that is both instructive and enjoyable to read. Joseph Kruse's elegant and learned opening piece provides a perfect keynote address... Ritchie Robertson (in an article that is destined to be recommended to thousands of students) throws fresh light on Atta Troll by examining the nature of mock epic as such as well as its relations to the epic traditions of antiquity and the Renaissance... David Constantine tackles the tricky subject of the Lazarus poems. It is easy to be moved by these, much harder to discuss them intelligently, but Constantine succeeds both in analysing the implications of the Lazarus motif and in making some thought-provoking remarks about poetry and horror. The volume concludes on a high note with a stylish piece by Anthony Phelan on Heine's heirs among contemporary poets.’ — David Pugh, Seminar XXXIX/4, 2003, 360-3

Contents:

2-23
'In der Literatur wie im Leben hat jeder Sohn einen Vater': Heinrich Heine zwischen Bibel und Homer, Cervantes und Shakespeare
Joseph A. Kruse
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24-50
From Battlefield to Paradise: A Reassessment of Heinrich Heine's Tragedy Almansor, its Sources, and their Significance for his Later Poetry and Thought
Nigel Reeves
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51-63
Heine and Shakespeare
Roger Paulin
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64-76
'A World of Fine Fabling': Epic Traditions in Heine's Atta Troll
Ritchie Robertson
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77-103
Nachgetragene Ironie: Moritz Hartmann und Heinrich Heine
Hubert Lengauer
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104-120
Grillparzer und Heine
Hans Höller
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122-141
Jüdische Dichter-Bilder in Heines 'Jehuda ben Halevy'
Hartmut Steinecke
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142-149
Heine and the Lied
Peter Branscombe
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150-167
Heine and the Russian Poets from Lermontov to Blok
Alexander Stillmark
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168-182
Topical Poetry and Satirical Rhyme: Karl Kraus's Debt to Heine
Edward Timms
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184-201
Heines Körperteile: Zur Anatomie des Dichters
T. J. Reed
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202-214
Heine's Lazarus Poems
David Constantine
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215-232
The Tribe of Harry: Heine and Contemporary Poetry
Anthony Phelan
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Bibliography entry:

Reed, T. J., and Alexander Stillmark (eds), Heine und die Weltliteratur (Cambridge: Legenda, 2000)

First footnote reference: 35 Heine und die Weltliteratur, ed. by T. J. Reed and Alexander Stillmark (Cambridge: Legenda, 2000), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Reed and Stillmark, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Reed, T. J., and Alexander Stillmark (eds). 2000. Heine und die Weltliteratur (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Reed and Stillmark 2000: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Reed and Stillmark 2000: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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