Georg Kaiser, After Expressionism
Five Plays

Translated by Fred Bridgham

New Translations 11

Modern Humanities Research Association

1 May 2016  •  388pp

ISBN: 978-1-781882-66-5 (paperback)  •  RRP £15.99, $22.99, €19.99

ISBN: 978-1-781882-75-7 (JSTOR ebook)

ISBN: 978-1-781882-76-4 (EBSCO ebook)

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ModernGermanDrama


After Expressionism had run its feverish course, its foremost exponent Georg Kaiser (1878-1945) — The Burghers of Calais, From Morn to Midnight, Gas -- proved equally adept at the lighter fare demanded by post-war audiences. Of some nine hundred comedies premièred in the Weimar era, his Pulp Fiction was an early triumph, often revived and played now as parody of a contagious literary genre, now as critique of Old World pieties. The New Woman emerged even more clearly towards the end of the ‘Roaring Twenties’ in Clairvoyance — though now also as antagonist, from whose vampish sophistication the loving wife emancipates both self and wayward husband. Between these two comedies, in One Day in October (acclaimed especially in Gustav Gründgens’s gripping production) focus shifts to psychological wrestling in deadly earnest over the parentage of a child. A parallel dilemma underlies the compelling plot, rising tension and searing climax of Agnete -- an uncanny precursor of the ‘Heimkehrer’ literature inspired by soldiers and captives returning home after 1945. This was indeed a fitting play to mark the rebirth of the Federal Republic of Germany in 1949. Kaiser had died in exile, though not before taking leave, like Prospero, with another wry comedy, The Gordian Egg.

Fred Bridgham’s studies of German literature and history of ideas have been wide-ranging. The present volume arose from his research into Georg Kaiser as curator of From Vienna to Weimar (music, cabaret, film) at Kings Place, London.

Reviews:

  • ‘This volume is a valuable addition to world literature libraries, and of great interest to scholars of theatre... Scholars can be grateful to Bridgham for his efforts in placing these works before a broader public.’ — Carole J. Lambert, Translation and Literature 27, 2019, 100-07 (full text online)

Contents:

[i]-[iv]
Front Matter
Fred Bridgham
Cite
[v]-[vi]
Table of Contents
Fred Bridgham
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1-12
Introduction
Fred Bridgham
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13-92
Pulp Fiction (Kolportage, 1924)
Fred Bridgham
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93-148
One Day in October (Oktobertag, 1927)
Fred Bridgham
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149-214
Clairvoyance (Hellseherei, 1929)
Fred Bridgham
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215-304
Agnete (1935)
Fred Bridgham
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305-380
The Gordian Egg (Das gordische Ei, 1941)
Fred Bridgham
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381-382
Back Matter
Fred Bridgham
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Bibliography entry:

Bridgham, Fred (trans.), Georg Kaiser, After Expressionism: Five Plays, New Translations, 11 (Cambridge: MHRA, 2016)

First footnote reference: 35 Georg Kaiser, After Expressionism: Five Plays, trans. by Fred Bridgham, New Translations, 11 (Cambridge: MHRA, 2016), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Bridgham, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Bridgham, Fred (trans.). 2016. Georg Kaiser, After Expressionism: Five Plays, New Translations, 11 (Cambridge: MHRA)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Bridgham 2016: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Bridgham 2016: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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