Enlightenment and Religion in German and Austrian Literature

Ritchie Robertson

Selected Essays 1

Legenda

  Summer 2017  •  476pp

ISBN: 978-1-781884-65-2 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99

ISBN: 978-1-781884-66-9 (paperback, 2018)

ISBN: 978-1-781884-67-6 (JSTOR ebook)

ISBN: 978-1-781884-68-3 (EBSCO ebook)

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Religion and enlightenment, the twin themes of this volume, always exist in tension. The tensions, affinities, and conflicts between the two, as they play out in German literature from Goethe, Schiller and Kleist down to Kafka and Thomas Mann, are explored in this volume, with one section examining their interplay in the neglected Austrian Enlightenment. Thanks to the historical and textual criticism of the Bible, the ‘sea of faith’ began its withdrawal sooner in Germany than in England, and this collection traces its retreat, looking especially at Nietzsche’s militant opposition to Christianity and at the expression in some modernist writing of a distinctly post-Christian and even post-human outlook.

Ritchie Robertson is Taylor Professor of German at the University of Oxford. This book aims to make more widely available some 27 of his essays on the theme of Enlightenment and religion, in both Germany and Austria, which are otherwise widely scattered in journals published over the last twenty years.

See other MHRA publications by: Ritchie Robertson (91)

Bibliography entry:

Robertson, Ritchie, Enlightenment and Religion in German and Austrian Literature, Selected Essays, 1 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2017)

First footnote reference: 35 Enlightenment and Religion in German and Austrian Literature, ritchie Robertson, Selected Essays, 1 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2017), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Robertson, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Robertson, Ritchie. 2017. Enlightenment and Religion in German and Austrian Literature, Selected Essays, 1 (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Robertson 2017: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Robertson 2017: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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