Culture, Censorship and the State in Twentieth-Century Italy

Edited by Guido Bonsaver and Robert Gordon

Legenda (General Series)

Legenda

13 September 2005  •  216pp

ISBN: 1-900755-95-5 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ContemporaryItalianArtDramaFilmFiction


Recent work on the cultural history of modern Italy has radically challenged received opinion about the relationship of state and culture during the twentieth century. In this rich interdisciplinary book the complex interactions and negotiations of control are elucidated by way of: case studies of major authors, filmmakers and artists and their encounters with censorship, patronage and other forms of direct state intervention from Mussolini to Berlusconi; analytical surveys of different periods, media and culture industries; and new research into Fascist censorship, the Resistance and its imprint in the collective memory, the introduction of television in the 1950s and the terrorism of the 1970s.

Guido Bonsaver is University Lecturer in Italian and Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford. He is the author of books on Italo Calvino and Elio Vittorini. Robert Gordon is Senior Lecturer in Italian and Fellow of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. He is the author of books on Pier Paolo Pasolini and Primo Levi.

Contents:

2-8
State, Culture, Censorship: An Introduction
Guido Bonsaver, Robert S. C. Gordon
Cite
9-21
How Exceptional were Culture-State Relations in Twentieth-Century Italy?
David Forgacs
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22-33
The Fascist Anthropological Revolution
Emilio Gentile
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34-41
Mussolini and the Italian Intellectuals
Philip V. Cannistraro
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42-53
L’Italia vera. Culture and the State in an Anti-Fascist Exile Journal
Deborah Holmes
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54-63
Fascist Censorship and Non-Fascist Literary Circles
Albertina Vittoria
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64-75
Women and Censorship in Fascist Italy: from Mura to Paola Masino
Lucia Re
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76-85
Theatrical Censorship in Italy during the Fascist Period
Clive Griffiths
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86-97
A Micro-History of State Censorship in Italy, 1931-39: The Case of Henry Furst
George Talbot
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98-108
Hollywood, Italy and the First World War: Italian Reactions to Film Versions of Ernest Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms
Stephen Gundle
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109-119
Anti-Fascism and Literary Criticism in Postwar Italy: Revisiting the mito americano
Jane Dunnett
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120-133
The Italian State and the Resistance Legacy in the 1950s and 1960s
Philip Cooke
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134-141
Ignazio Silone and the Politics of ‘Archive Malice’
Elizabeth Leake
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142-149
The Double Bind of Ignazio Silone: Between Archive and Hagiography
Stanislao Pugliese
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150-157
Television and Censorship: Preliminary Research Notes
Vanessa Roghi
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158-167
Dario Fo, Franca Rame and the Censors
Luciana D'Arcangeli
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168-178
Film and the Anni di piombo: Representations of Politically-Motivated Violence in Recent Italian Cinema
Alan O'Leary
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179-190
Censorship in the Time of Berlusconi
Alberto Abruzzese
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Bibliography entry:

Bonsaver, Guido, and Robert Gordon (eds), Culture, Censorship and the State in Twentieth-Century Italy (Cambridge: Legenda, 2005)

First footnote reference: 35 Culture, Censorship and the State in Twentieth-Century Italy, ed. by Guido Bonsaver and Robert Gordon (Cambridge: Legenda, 2005), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Bonsaver and Gordon, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Bonsaver, Guido, and Robert Gordon (eds). 2005. Culture, Censorship and the State in Twentieth-Century Italy (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Bonsaver and Gordon 2005: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Bonsaver and Gordon 2005: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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