Books and Periodicals in Brazil 1768-1930
A Transatlantic Perspective

Edited by Ana Cláudia Suriani da Silva and Sandra Guardini Vasconcelos

Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 9

Legenda

10 December 2014  •  294pp

ISBN: 978-1-909662-32-2 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

EnlightenmentPortugueseFiction


Before the Portuguese Royal Court moved to its South-American colony in 1808, books and periodicals had a very limited circulation there. It was only when Brazilian ports were opened to foreign trade that the book trade began to flourish, and printed matter became more easily available to readers, whether for pleasure, for instruction or for political reasons. This book brings together a collection of original articles on the transnational relations between Brazil and Europe, especially England and France, in the domain of literature and print culture from its early stages to the end of the 1920s. It covers the time when it was forbidden to print in Brazil, and Portugal strictly controlled which books were sent to the colony, through the quick flourishing of a transnational printing industry and book market after 1822, to the shift of hegemony in the printing business from foreign to Brazilian hands at the beginning of the twentieth century.

Ana Cláudia Suriani da Silva is Lecturer in Brazilian Studies at University College London. Sandra Guardini Vasconcelos is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of São Paulo.

Contents:

1-12
Introduction
Ana Cláudia Suriani da Silva, Sandra Guardini Vasconcelos
Cite
13-34
Reading in Colonial Brazil
Márcia Abreu
Cite
35-51
Booksellers in Rio de Janeiro: The Book Trade and Circulation of Ideas from 1808 to 1831
Lucia Maria Bastos Pereira das Neves, Tania Maria Tavare Bessone da Cruz Ferreira
Cite
52-67
Seditious Books and Ideas of Revolution in Brazil (1830–71)
Marisa Midori Deaecto, Lincoln Secco
Cite
68-86
Migratory Literary Forms: British Novels in Nineteenth-Century Brazil
Sandra Guardini Vasconcelos
Cite
87-117
The Library that Disappeared: The Rio de Janeiro British Subscription Library
Nelson Schapochnik
Cite
118-132
The History of a Pseudo-Dumas Novel: The Hand of the Dead
Paulo Motta Oliveira
Cite
133-147
Revista Nacional e Estrangeira (1839–40): A Foreign or a Brazilian Magazine?
Maria Eulália Ramicelli
Cite
148-162
The Role of the Press in the Incorporation of Brazil into the Paris Fashion System
Ana Cláudia Suriani da Silva
Cite
163-175
The Brazilian and the French Bas de Page
Lúcia Granja
Cite
176-198
How to Be a Professional Writer in Nineteenth-Century Brazil
Marisa Lajolo, Regina Zilberman
Cite
199-214
Print Technologies, World News and Narrative Form in Machado de Assis
Jussara Menezes Quadros
Cite
215-229
The Brazilian Book Market in Portugal in the Second Half of the Nineteenth Century and the Paradigm Change in Luso-Brazilian Cultural Relations
Patrícia de Jesus Palma
Cite
230-244
Popular Editions and Best-sellers at the End of the Nineteenth Century in Brazil
Alessandra El Far
Cite
245-260
The Brazilian Publishing Industry at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century: The Path of Monteiro Lobato
Cilza Bignotto, Milena Ribeiro Martins
Cite

Bibliography entry:

Silva, Ana Cláudia Suriani da, and Sandra Guardini Vasconcelos (eds), Books and Periodicals in Brazil 1768-1930: A Transatlantic Perspective, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 9 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2014)

First footnote reference: 35 Books and Periodicals in Brazil 1768-1930: A Transatlantic Perspective, ed. by Ana Cláudia Suriani da Silva and Sandra Guardini Vasconcelos, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 9 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2014), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Silva and Vasconcelos, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Silva, Ana Cláudia Suriani da, and Sandra Guardini Vasconcelos (eds). 2014. Books and Periodicals in Brazil 1768-1930: A Transatlantic Perspective, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 9 (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Silva and Vasconcelos 2014: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Silva and Vasconcelos 2014: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


This Legenda title was first published by Modern Humanities Research Association and Maney Publishing but rights to it are now held by Modern Humanities Research Association and Routledge.

Routledge distributes this title on behalf on Legenda. You can search for it at their site by following this link.


Permanent link to this title: