Bodies of Disorder
Gender and Degeneration in Baroja and Blasco Ibáñez

Katharine Murphy

Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 26

Legenda

1 November 2017  •  206pp

ISBN: 978-1-910887-30-1 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ISBN: 978-1-781884-05-8 (paperback, 9 August 2019)  •  RRP £9.99, $12.50, €12.50

ISBN: 978-1-781884-06-5 (JSTOR ebook)

Access online: Books@JSTOR

ModernSpanishFictionstudent-priced


In addition to its original library hardback edition, this title is now on sale in the new student-priced Legenda paperback range.


Discourses of degeneration (social, political, medical) peaked in the 1890s across Europe, and posited the moral and biological decline, even sterility, of European nations. In early twentieth-century Spain, the novels of Pío Baroja and Vicente Blasco Ibáñez both assimilated and subverted the cultural myths of degeneration that were fuelled by influential European theorists such as Bénédict Morel, Cesare Lombroso and Max Nordau. In the light of widespread anxieties about reproduction and national decadence, this interdisciplinary book traces the creative tension between each author’s literary representations of the degenerate female body and the consumer agency of women readers. Through its alignment of gender paradigms and degenerationism in Baroja and Blasco Ibáñez, Bodies of Disorder offers a challenge to established hierarchies of canonical and popular fiction. Countering Baroja’s resounding public disdain for his Valencian contemporary, Katharine Murphy repositions Blasco as markedly closer to the so-called ‘Generation of 1898’ than hitherto acknowledged.

Dr Katharine Murphy is Senior Lecturer in Hispanic Studies at the University of Exeter. Author of Re-reading Pío Baroja and English Literature (2004), she has published widely on Comparative Literature and Spanish Modernism.

Reviews:

  • ‘Murphy highlights the substantial points of comparison between the two authors, despite the hostility between them and their very different journeys through the literary canon. Taken in its entirety, this book deftly sets about dismantling quite a number of critical distinctions and commonplaces... This will be a valuable book for anyone working on the Spanish novel, discourses of degeneration across Europe, cultural studies, and on the dynamics of female literacy and agency.’ — Geraldine Lawless, Bulletin of Spanish Studies 96.9, 2019, 1553-55

Contents:

i-vi
Bodies of Disorder: Bodies of Disorder
Katharine Murphy
Cite
vii-viii
Table of Contents
Katharine Murphy
Cite
ix-x
Acknowledgements
K.M.
Cite
1-26
Introduction
Katharine Murphy
Cite
28-51
Chapter 1 the Nordau Effect: Degeneracy and the Artist in Baroja’s Camino De Perfección (1902) and Blasco’s La Maja Desnuda (1906)
Katharine Murphy
Cite
52-74
Chapter 2 Trauma and the Origins of Neurosis: From Degeneration To the Unconscious in Two Novels of 1900
Katharine Murphy
Cite
76-96
Chapter 3 Prostitution and Criminality in Turn-of-the-Century Madrid: Baroja’s La Busca (1904)
Katharine Murphy
Cite
97-116
Chapter 4 Crowd Psychology and the Urban Masses: Blasco Ibáñez’s La Horda (1905)
Katharine Murphy
Cite
118-136
Chapter 5 Adultery, Infanticide and Sensation Fiction: the Morality of Reproduction in Blasco Ibáñez’s Cañas Y Barro (1902)
Katharine Murphy
Cite
137-154
Chapter 6 Eugenics and National Decline: the Failure of Maternity in Baroja’s El árbol De La Ciencia (1911)
Katharine Murphy
Cite
155-175
Conclusion Readership and the Legacy of Degeneration Theory
Katharine Murphy
Cite
176-186
Bibliography
Katharine Murphy
Cite
187-196
Index
Katharine Murphy
Cite

Bibliography entry:

Murphy, Katharine, Bodies of Disorder: Gender and Degeneration in Baroja and Blasco Ibáñez, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 26 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2017)

First footnote reference: 35 Katharine Murphy, Bodies of Disorder: Gender and Degeneration in Baroja and Blasco Ibáñez, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 26 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2017), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Murphy, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Murphy, Katharine. 2017. Bodies of Disorder: Gender and Degeneration in Baroja and Blasco Ibáñez, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 26 (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Murphy 2017: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Murphy 2017: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


This title is distributed on behalf of MHRA by Ingram’s. Booksellers and libraries can order direct from Ingram by setting up a free ipage® Account: click here for more.


Permanent link to this title: