Benedikte Naubert (1765-1819) and her Relations to English Culture

Hilary Brown

Bithell Series of Dissertations 27

MHRA Texts and Dissertations 63

Maney Publishing for the Modern Humanities Research Association and the Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies

1 May 2005  •  176pp

ISBN: 978-1-904350-42-2 (paperback)  •  RRP £25, $40

ISBN: 978-1-781880-85-2 (JSTOR ebook)

Access online: Books@JSTOR

EnlightenmentGermanEnglishFictionTranslation


The eighteenth century saw the first significant phase of cultural interchange between Britain and Germany. This study examines the part played in this process by women writers, who were entering the literary world in large numbers for the first time. It asks whether women — as readers, translators and authors — were particularly receptive to the work of other women, and whether a cross-cultural female literary tradition emerged during the period.

The study offers a detailed case-study of the German writer Benedikte Naubert, now known for her collection of fairytales but also a prolific novelist. It looks first at Naubert's engagement with English literature, that is to say at her numerous translations of English novels, and at the ways in which Anglophilia influenced the production of her own fiction. It establishes how Naubert's interest in England and English literature was related to her position as a woman writer. It then examines the reception of her novels and stories in Britain, questioning how far the response to her texts was related to issues of gender. Naubert's work is compared throughout to that of other women writers, and the study thus sheds new light on the extent to which cross-cultural interchange influenced the development of women's writing in both countries.

Download: Introduction (PDF)

Reviews:

  • ‘A detailed bibliography [rounds] out this meticulous, scholarly work. Brown’s thorough and perceptive investigation of Naubert’s fiction and English literature makes previous work on the author obsolete. It takes Naubert’s oeuvre out of the niche of gender studies and places it squarely in the mainstream of German literary history and in the rich tradition of Anglo-German literary and cultural cross-currents.’ — Barbara Becker-Cantarino, Modern Language Review 102, 2007, 565 (full text online)

Contents:

i-iii
Front Matter
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iv-iv
Table of Contents
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v-vi
Acknowledgements
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1-5
Introduction
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6-21
Chapter One Anglo-German Literary Relations: A Female Tradition?
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22-50
Chapter Two Naubert’s Translations From English
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51-76
Chapter Three English Models in Naubert’s Fiction
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77-100
Chapter Four Naubert’s Portrayal of Britain
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101-135
Chapter Five Naubert’s Reception in Britain
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136-139
Conclusion
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140-140
Appendix One: Naubert’s Translations From English
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141-142
Appendix Two: French and English Versions of Naubert’s Works
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143-156
Bibliography
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157-161
INDEX
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Bibliography entry:

Brown, Hilary, Benedikte Naubert (1765-1819) and her Relations to English Culture, Bithell Series of Dissertations, 27 (Cambridge: MHRA, 2005)

First footnote reference: 35 Hilary Brown, Benedikte Naubert (1765-1819) and her Relations to English Culture, Bithell Series of Dissertations, 27 (Cambridge: MHRA, 2005), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Brown, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Brown, Hilary. 2005. Benedikte Naubert (1765-1819) and her Relations to English Culture, Bithell Series of Dissertations, 27 (Cambridge: MHRA)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Brown 2005: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Brown 2005: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


This title was first published by Maney Publishing for the Modern Humanities Research Association and the Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies but rights to it are now held by Modern Humanities Research Association and the Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies.

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