The Art of Cervantes in Don Quixote
Critical Essays

Edited by Stephen Boyd, Trudi L. Darby and Terence O'Reilly

Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures 27

Legenda

23 September 2019  •  302pp

ISBN: 978-1-781885-05-5 (hardback)  •  RRP £75, $99, €85

ISBN: 978-1-781885-06-2 (paperback, 2020)  •  RRP £9.99, $12.50, €12.50

ISBN: 978-1-781885-07-9 (JSTOR ebook)

Access online: Books@JSTOR

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Four centuries after his death in 1616, Cervantes’s great novel (the first novel), Don Quixote (1605; 1615), continues to fascinate readers and generate debate about key questions. Were the efforts of the deluded hidalgo and his corpulent squire to revive the lost age of chivalry intended simply to amuse? Or to be the vehicle for a sustained reflection on the acts of writing and reading, the state of Spanish society, the nature of reality itself? And if so, from what political and ideological perspectives? Should Don Quixote, a multi-generic text par excellence, be understood not simply as a novel, but as a poem and a performance? Cervantes is acknowledged as a supremely innovative stylist, but what was the nature and extent of his debt to classical and Renaissance rhetoric?

These major areas of critical enquiry are addressed by ten leading scholars based in British and Irish universities. Each essay focuses on a particular aspect of the novel, and examines in its light particular chapters, scenes, motifs or techniques, while at the same time offering a comprehensive reading of the text. Taken as a whole, the ideas and approaches presented in this volume contribute to an understanding of Cervantes's art in Don Quixote that balances detail with synthesis.

Contents:

1-8
Introduction
Stephen Boyd
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9-34
Books, Readers, Readings, and Writings in Don Quixote
Trevor J. Dadson
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35-64
‘¿Qué lector será el que no se ría?’: Incongruity and Ironic Allusion in Don Quijote, {s}ii. {/s}60
Oliver Noble Wood
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65-90
An Authorized Version? Siting Authority and Citing auctores in Don Quixote
Richard Rabone
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91-118
From Stage to Page: Don Quixote as Performance
B. W. Ife
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119-130
Don Quixote and the Picaresque Novel: A Problematic Game of Triangles
Robert Oakley
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131-157
Value, Price, and Money: Early Modern Economic Theory in Three Episodes of Don Quixote
Brian Brewer
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158-182
Moors, Moriscos, Disbelief: Beyond the Authors of the Quixote
Anthony Lappin
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183-202
Reconsidering Literary Criminality in Don Quixote
Ted L. L. Bergman
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203-236
Fortune and Providence, santos y caballeros, in Don Quixote {s}ii{/s}
Stephen Boyd
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237-262
Don Quixote, {s}ii. {/s}71–74: The Sense of an Ending
Jeremy Lawrance
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Bibliography entry:

Boyd, Stephen, Trudi L. Darby, and Terence O'Reilly (eds), The Art of Cervantes in Don Quixote: Critical Essays, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 27 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2019)

First footnote reference: 35 The Art of Cervantes in Don Quixote: Critical Essays, ed. by Stephen Boyd, Trudi L. Darby and Terence O'Reilly, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 27 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2019), p. 21.

Subsequent footnote reference: 37 Boyd, Darby, and O'Reilly, p. 47.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)

Bibliography entry:

Boyd, Stephen, Trudi L. Darby, and Terence O'Reilly (eds). 2019. The Art of Cervantes in Don Quixote: Critical Essays, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Cultures, 27 (Cambridge: Legenda)

Example citation: ‘A quotation occurring on page 21 of this work’ (Boyd, Darby, and O'Reilly 2019: 21).

Example footnote reference: 35 Boyd, Darby, and O'Reilly 2019: 21.

(To see how these citations were worked out, follow this link.)


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